How To Safely Redesign Your Website Without Destroying Your Business? (Best solution)

How to Redesign a Website Without Losing SEO

  1. Take Inventory of Your Pages.
  2. Use a Test Site.
  3. Audit Your Redesigned Site.
  4. Set Up 301 Redirects.
  5. Activate Redesigned Site.
  6. Verify Robots Information.
  7. Set Up Search Console.
  8. Monitor SEO Performance Changes.

Can I redesign an existing website?

Yes, some minor tweaks may be made along the way, but with the constraints of the specification, timescales and budget all set, little real change will occur. Once again, user feedback is largely ignored. Most redesigns of existing websites are run without any clear idea of whether they will be successful on launch.

How do I redesign my business website?

7 Steps to Launch Your Website Redesign

  1. Analyze the “old” website.
  2. Identify your priorities.
  3. Define and update the website’s target audience.
  4. Find out what is working on the current website.
  5. Create a list of desired design changes.
  6. Define the new goals.
  7. Start building the website redesign plan.

How often should you redesign your company’s website?

Ideally, you should do a full redesign of your website every two to three years to stay modern. However, if your website is not performing in terms of traffic or conversion it is time to re-evaluate and make some updates in order to capture your user’s attention and turn them into customers.

How much does it cost to hire someone to redesign a website?

To recap: redesigning a site on your own can cost anywhere from $0-300. Working with a freelancer can cost anywhere from $500-$5,000. Hiring a web design agency will run you in the range of $3,000 to $100,000. Your website might have cost anywhere in these ranges to build.

Why You Should Consider inbound before your next website redesign?

Introducing inbound marketing allows you to work on your team to the best of their potential. This is helpful in more ways than one if you want everyone to be able to understand inbound strategy. Thus, you will be able to foster better teamwork between different kinds of sectors.

How do I make my website redesign?

Take the following steps to prepare for a website redesign:

  1. Define your goals and your budget.
  2. Identify what’s working on your current site and what isn’t.
  3. Research top competitors and other sites you like.
  4. Audit your brand and develop guidelines.
  5. Gather recent marketing samples.
  6. List out your must-haves.

What should I look for in a website redesign?

Let’s unpack eight critical steps to take when redesigning your website.

  • Benchmark your current performance metrics.
  • Determine your website redesign goals.
  • Define your branding and messaging.
  • Define your buyer persona(s).
  • Protect your search engine optimized pages.
  • Analyze the competition.

What does a website redesign include?

A website redesign is a high-level overhaul that involves significantly changing elements like the code, content, structure, and visuals of your current website to better serve your visitors. A great website redesign tends to boost revenue, lower bounce rates, and improve user experience (UX).

Why do companies redesign their websites?

The most common reasons are to rebrand your site, increase your traffic, generate more leads, and add functionality to improve the user experience. Your business goals will determine the scale of your website redesign.

When should you change your website?

“It’s ideal to update a website at least monthly but weekly is preferred. That could be a minor change to the main content or a new blog post. Whatever the update is, it’s helpful to constantly make updates of any size.

Should I change my website?

The most simple answer to the question of how often you should update your website is: as often as it needs updating. Minor website updates might be made every day, whereas a full website revamp might come every two to three years. As long as your answer to this question isn’t “never,” you’re off to a great start.

How long does it take to redesign a website?

Typically, plan for a website design and development to take between two to four months. Although that may sound like an eternity, keep in mind, once all the information is obtained, a website can be turned around rather quickly.

How long does it take to design a website?

You also have to consider how long your site will take to plan out and design. In our experience, building a website usually takes anywhere between two to four months if you’re working with a professional agency. However, you also have the option of using a website builder if you need to create a site more quickly.

How to Redesign Your Business’ Website Without Damaging Its SEO

Businesses were reluctant to understand how important the internet will one day become as a marketing and sales tool in the early days of the internet’s existence. However, as the majority of people saw the possibilities, business websites quickly became a mission-critical component of any company’s armory. Small firms, in particular, were sluggish to hop on the bandwagon, and this was especially true for small enterprises. They were apprehensive about investing their hard-earned marketing dollars in an untested media.

As a result, 36% of small firms still do not have any kind of website at all, according to statistics.

This is due to the fact that they have spent so much money on the initial development, maintenance, and round after round of SEO optimization that they are concerned that rebuilding would mean starting from the beginning.

If the procedure is carried out in the proper manner, any company may bring their website up to date without suffering any negative consequences in terms of search engine rankings, traffic, or visibility.

Why should you redesign a working website?

Businesses were slow to understand the importance of the internet as a marketing and sales tool in the early days of the internet’s existence. After the majority saw the possibilities, business websites became a mission-critical component of every company’s toolkit overnight. Although many large corporations were quick to hop on the bandwagon, small firms, in particular, were sluggish to do so. Because it was a new medium, they were apprehensive to put their hard-earned marketing funds to use.

This has resulted in the fact that 36% of small firms still do not have any kind of website.

After investing so much money on the initial construction, ongoing maintenance, and round after round of SEO optimization, they are concerned that redesigning will need them to start from the beginning of the process again.

Anyone may bring their website up to contemporary standards if the procedure is carried out in the proper manner, and they will not suffer any negative consequences in terms of search engine rankings, traffic, or visibility.

Is an SEO-neutral site redesign possible?

The good news is that changing your company’s website will not have a negative impact on your search engine optimization. If you follow the correct procedures, you should have no negative consequences and will finish up with a new website that both you and your consumers will like using. However, in order to get there, meticulous preparation, technical know-how, and well-timed execution are required. Of course, if you decide to remodel your company’s website, you are not required to do it by yourselves.

However, even if you opt to leave your redesign in the hands of a professional, it is beneficial to be familiar with the essential components of the process before beginning.

You’ll be able to undertake some of the work yourself and save some money, or at the very least you’ll be informed enough to comprehend what your web design business is doing and what you’re paying them to accomplish on your behalf.

Where to start with your website redesign

Before you begin the process of redesigning your website, you’ll want to be aware of what you’re getting yourself into so that you can plan accordingly. Fortunately, despite the fact that the task is tough, the procedure is less complicated than you may imagine. As a general guideline, the following are the primary actions you’ll need to take.

Conduct an existing site analysis

The first stage in the process is to determine exactly where your existing site stands in terms of performance and search engine optimization objectives. The failure to complete this stage will leave you with no method of determining how well or poorly your new website is performing in comparison to the competition. For the most part, you’ll want to collect information regarding your existing website’s performance on the following metrics:

  • Data on search rankings for significant brand keywords, domain authority, time spent on site, bounce rate, unique visits (by week and month), and conversion rate

A backlink audit should be performed after you’ve gathered all of your data before moving ahead with the rest of the process. This will assist you to find any links to your site that may be detracting from your search engine ranking position. Believe it or not, a rival might attempt to destroy your company’s website by connecting to your site from doubtful sources or by using obscene or spammy anchor text to direct traffic to your site. Don’t be concerned if you come across something similar to this.

Source With any luck, though, the data you collect will accurately mirror the performance of an existing website that is prospering.

You shouldn’t be concerned if the performance of your existing site falls short of your expectations.

In reality, that is the final stage in any scenario, and it is the conclusion of the process.

Identify high-performing content

The next phase is one of the most critical components of the entire procedure. Its purpose is to examine the analytics data from your existing website in order to determine which pages are the most valuable. Pages with a high sharing rate, a big number of inbound links, or pages that produce a considerable number of page views and time on site are considered valuable in this context. The pages that you have identified must be safeguarded at all costs since they are the engine that drives your site’s search engine optimization performance.

Because that is exactly what you are attempting to avoid, take your time with this stage and ensure that no stone is left unturned.

Optimize content in the pre-redesign stage

Probably one of the most significant aspects of the entire procedure is the next phase. Its purpose is to examine the analytics data from your current website in order to determine which pages are the most valuable. Pages with a high sharing rate, a big number of inbound links, or pages that produce a considerable number of page views and time on site are considered to be valuable in this context. Your site’s SEO success is dependent on the pages that you have identified, and you must ensure that they are kept intact at all costs.

The performance of keywords and incoming traffic may suffer significantly if you were to make any of them unavailable or otherwise change their content. In order to avoid this outcome, take your time with this stage and make certain that no stone is left unturned in your investigation.

Prune and redirect content

As soon as you’re confident that you’ve cataloged and optimized everything on your old site, it’s time to figure out which pages will be transferred to the new site and which pages will be removed entirely. Keep in mind that the pages you aren’t maintaining contributed to the overall worth of your present site. In order to avoid this, you won’t be able to just remove what you don’t want and go on. Instead, you’ll want to create a list of the pages you intend to remove from your website so that you may redirect any incoming traffic intended for those pages to other areas of your website.

  1. Source In the event that a visitor attempts to access a page that has been removed, a 301 redirect will immediately load whichever page you provide as a substitute.
  2. Furthermore, because it stops your consumers from seeing a page not found message, it will not impact your search results by redirecting people to ineffective landing sites.
  3. Internal links to the pages that are being removed should be removed from your site where necessary – unless the connection makes sense with regard to the page that is being redirected.
  4. The bottom line is that, if at all possible, you don’t want to direct people to pages they didn’t want to see.

Update sitemaps and architecture

The next step is to determine which pages will be transferred to the new site, and which pages will be removed from the current site after you’re confident that you’ve cataloged and optimized everything on the existing site. You should bear in mind that even the pages that you aren’t maintaining contributed to the overall worth of your site. This means that you will not be able to simply erase anything you do not want and continue your work. It is preferable to compile a list of the pages you want to remove so that any incoming traffic directed to them may be diverted to other areas of your website.

Source When someone attempts to view a page that has been removed, a 301 redirect will immediately load whatever page you provide as a substitute.

As a bonus, because it keeps your users from seeing a page not found message, it won’t hurt your search rankings by redirecting them to ineffective pages.

Internal links to the pages that are being removed should be removed from your website whenever possible – unless the connection makes sense with regard to the page that is being redirected.

If you have any questions, please contact us. The bottom line is that, if at all possible, you don’t want visitors to be sent to sites they didn’t want to see. Otherwise, your bounce rate will increase, and the performance of your website may suffer.

Make additional improvements

You’ve reached the most exciting portion of the game. That is, revamping the site’s graphical elements and pages is what we are talking about. However, you should not limit yourself to simply updating the design and feel of your website. Additionally, you should go out of your way to create as many SEO improvements as you possibly can while you are doing so. With the passage of time, there may be a number of things you can do to improve your website’s search engine optimization that weren’t available when you first launched your site.

  • Observant Google users may have noticed that Google’s search results pages now contain far more information than they did in the past.
  • If you’ve ever been curious about where everything comes from, structured data is the solution.
  • And Google encourages website owners to do this, so they reward them by giving them priority placement in search results when they provide such rich results.
  • A visual method that makes it simple for anybody to categorise the different types of data on their website in a way that Google can understand and utilize is known as thestructured data markup helper.
  • Due to the fact that you’re rebuilding your website, you’ll also want to pick a responsive design that will adjust to the demands of whatever device is used to view it.
  • And it is the one thing that is certain in this situation.
  • Considering that Twitter didn’t exist until only a few years ago and that now, firms are trademarking hashtags because they have such incredible marketing value, you should have a good understanding of how rapidly things can change.
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Conclusion

Just to summarize, you should now understand the fundamentals of revamping your company website without compromising its vital SEO qualities. You’ve learned how to go about assessing the performance of your current website, how to determine which pages are the most value on your site, and how to prevent harming the success you’ve already achieved. You also understand why periodically updating your website is a fantastic idea that will benefit your company’s bottom line. That’s even better. In addition, if you require outside support to complete your task, don’t be embarrassed to ask questions based on the knowledge you’ve gained here.

It is the most significant lesson from this article that you should stop being frightened of the website redesign process and instead embrace it as a crucial part of keeping your company’s most valuable marketing asset performing at optimal levels.

Now that you’ve seen how to have the best of both worlds, you can design and build a website that’s stunningly attractive and useful, while yet protecting all of your hard-won gains in the seemingly endless fight to be the top of the search engine rankings.

7 Tips On Redesigning Your Website Without Losing SEO

Each redesign is distinct and necessitates the use of a distinct approach. Keeping these seven suggestions in mind, however, will make it much easier for you to revamp your website without losing your search engine rating.

1. Analyze all website pages

Google Analytics and Google Search Console may be used to determine which pages of your website are receiving the most traffic and which ones are receiving the greatest rankings. In order for those sites to have the shortest, typeable URLs that are easy to remember and share, the move should be centered on them (and don’t forget to set up an HTTP redirect, which we’ll get to later). And perhaps some of these sites should be highlighted in prominent positions in the newly updated navigation panel in order to garner even more attention?

2. Rewrite or combine pages that don’t perform well

Take a look at the other pages that didn’t make it to the top of the list. Check to see if they can be tweaked in any way to provide better outcomes. It is often as simple as creating more interesting material or changing the prominent picture on a website. Not only would rewriting some copy make sense in conjunction with the redesign itself, but it should also not be forgotten.

3. Don’t erase any pages and use 301 redirects to permanently redirect renamed pages

Simply removing pages will result in 404 “Page Not Found” problems, which will have a detrimental impact on your site’s rankings and search engine traffic because your site would be shrinking and discarding information. For example, if a certain piece of information is outdated or no longer relevant, you would want to inform Google that a newer version of that material is available and redirect Google (and, of course, your visitors!) to that updated page. This way, if the page had strong ranks or was linked to from other sites, you wouldn’t lose the value of those things, which is important if you want to maintain your SEO rankings.

301 permanent redirects are used to effortlessly guide users to the new URLs while still keeping the SEO rankings associated with the old URLs.

4. Keep an eye out for 404 errors

An increase in the number of 404 errors is an exceedingly unwanted side effect of the website makeover process. First and foremost, it results in a poor user experience since site visitors are unable to locate what they are looking for (despite the fact that Google suggested it in the search results). This might result in a large number of people leaving your website and migrating to a rival. You may still minimize your bounce rate by developing a personalized 404 page that includes links to your most frequently viewed sites, as well as a few words of apologies and perhaps a generous gift to entice the consumer to stay a bit longer on your website.

Maintain all old URLs and ensure that they receive proper redirects!

5. Check for redirect loops and minimize them

A redirect loop happens when one URL redirects to another, which then redirects to another, which then redirects to another, and so on until your browser stops loading the page and produces an error. It will have an instant negative impact on your bounce rate, just as it does with 404 errors. Redirect loops have also been shown to have negative effects on search engine optimization.

The maximum number of redirects tracked by Google’s crawlers is frequently about 16, therefore even permanent 301 redirects will be ineffectual in transferring SEO rankings if the loop is too lengthy. 301 redirects are the most common type of permanent redirect.

6. Make sure that internal links lead where they are supposed to

In the course of running a website, it is fairly typical to neglect to update the internal links on the pages of the website. It’s simple to remember to change your main navigation, but if you have a blog with several posts that have links inside the text, it might be more difficult to remember. As a result of this error, the mechanism by which the search crawler scans your website will be altered, and your SEO rankings will suffer as a result. Of course, redirects are possible, but it would be preferable to update the page directly rather than through a redirect.

In the worst-case situation, broken links will result in a 404 error message.

7. Monitor the changes

Once the redesign is complete, it is critical to pay close attention to the Analytics data. Make sure to submit the new sitemap for the updated website and monitor its indexing to ensure that it is correctly indexed. Also, pay close attention to the statistics as visitors look for and acclimate to the new or amended material. For a company, redesigning a website may be a difficult undertaking. It is a one-of-a-kind, complex procedure that is fully dependent on the company requirements as well as the initial flaws with the original website.

Engage the services of a web design business to ensure that the process runs well and that you do not lose any of the ranks that you have worked so hard to get.

How To Redesign a Website Without Losing SEO (Step By Step Guide)

Want to remodel your website, but are concerned about losing your search engine ranking positions in the process? In order to avoid this concern, many website owners are hesitant to rebuild their websites. After devoting a significant amount of time and effort to your digital marketing, it’s understandable that you’d want to maintain your ranks. However, the reality is that people’s tastes vary with time, and the longer you wait to revamp your site, the more out of date it will appear. Furthermore, contemporary design strategies frequently result in improved functionality and user experience for your site’s visitors.

More leads are generated as a result of happier visitors.

How to Redesign a Website Without Losing SEO

Want to rebuild your website, but are concerned about losing your search engine ranking positions? For this reason, many website owners are apprehensive of redesigning their sites. After devoting a significant amount of time and effort to your digital marketing, it’s understandable that you’d want to keep your ranks. In reality, preferences vary with time, and the longer you wait to revamp your website, the more out of date it will appear. Newer design strategies also have the potential to enhance the functionality and user experience of your website.

More leads are generated as a result of happy visitors. Our step-by-step method on redesigning a website without losing search engine rankings is included in this post for your convenience.

1. Make a Back-Up of Your Website

It is usually a good idea to build a backup of your old website before embarking on a website redesign project as a preventive step. Make a backup of your theme files, plugins, and database before proceeding. It will be easier to restore the website to its prior state if things go wrong in the future in this manner. It is actually rather simple to create a backup of your data. If you follow the easy steps outlined in this post, you will be able to generate a backup of your website using a plugin called UpdraftPlus.

2. Create a “Site Under Maintenance” Page

A backup of your existing website should be created before you begin work on any changes to the site. This is a wise precaution to take before making any changes to the site. Backing up your theme files, plugins, and database is highly recommended. It will be easier to restore the website to its prior state if things go wrong this way. It is actually rather simple to create a backup of your files. If you follow the steps outlined in this post, you will be able to generate a backup of your website using a plugin called UpdraftPlus.

3. Check Your Current SEO Standings

It’s critical to collect your website’s SEO data once you’ve set up your maintenance page before you make any changes to the appearance of your site. This will assist you in comparing the performance of your site after you have made your adjustments. Go to your Google Analytics monitoring tool and export a list of the best-performing blog articles and web pages you’ve published recently. To track your keyword rankings and individual page rankings, log into the Google Search Console (or whichever service you use to track this information).

4. Keep the Same Content and Structure

Following the completion of your SEO data collection, you will need to analyze the content and structure of your website. To put it another way, you should try to maintain the content of your web pages as consistent as possible when upgrading your design. The URL structure and the hierarchy of your site pages are both referred to as your site structure. As a result, you should refrain from adding or removing any pages from your website or changing the URLs. When changing any of your pages or the URL structure, you’ll need to use 301 redirects to ensure that your site stays up and running properly.

In addition, the Redirection Manager plugin from All in One SEO makes it simple to handle your 301 redirects and 404 issues.

The Automatic Redirection tool, which is available on all plans, enables you to automatically redirect visitors and search engines to your new content anytime a URL is deleted or changed.

5. Do On-Page Optimization of Your Content

After you’ve implemented your design modifications, you’ll need to do an on-page study of the content on your website. If you want assistance with the optimization, please refer to our comprehensive SEO tutorial for beginners. While you are constructing your website, try to maintain the title, headers, meta-descriptions, and the body of the material the same as they were before.

Creating a spreadsheet will also be beneficial since it will allow you to compare the modifications that may have occurred during the redesigning process. You may create a spreadsheet that looks similar to the one seen in the screenshot below.

6. Test Your new Design on a Staging Site.

This is a critical step that must be completed! Make sure you read this over and over again. Whenever you are constructing or redesigning a website, it is generally recommended that you do it on a staging server first. Typically, this is done so that you may audit your website and evaluate the operation of the site. If you discover any issues, you will be able to quickly and simply correct them before launching your website. When a search engine optimization professional forgets to tick a box, the result is that search engines are discouraged from indexing the site.

That is something you simply do not want to happen!

7. Launch the Site

Finally, it’s time to put all of your preparations to the ultimate test. Publish your new site to the live server and then remove it from the staging environment to avoid confusion. Make sure you turn off the maintenance mode and inform your visitors about the new look. Perhaps they can assist you by reporting any bugs that may have been discovered.

8. Post Launch Audit

Even after you have launched your website, your work is far from finished. You must still double-check for any mistakes. “But I just double-checked the staging site for faults,” you could say. “I get your point.” But believe us when we tell that when it comes to making design modifications, you can never be too cautious. During the auditing process, there are a few things you should keep an eye out for. Please take a closer look at the following information:

  • Check the top-performing content to ensure that it is still operational. This may be accomplished with the aid of an SEO checklist. If you have installed any redirects, make sure they are all working properly. Look over your website to see that the meta descriptions, titles, and headers are precisely the way you want them to be
  • Compare the pagespeed of your new website with the pagespeed of your old website. It is possible to evaluate the page performance using a variety of tools, such as this WordPress speed test tool. Deactivate anyWordPress plugins that you are no longer interested in using. They may cause your website to load more slowly. Check the sitemap.xml for any 404 errors and fix them if you find any. If you come across any, fix them. Cross-browser compatibility should be tested. Opening the same page in multiple browsers and seeing if they all load properly is the most straightforward method of testing this. In order to ensure that your website is completely responsive on mobile devices. Copy and paste the tracking codes into the new website design to ensure that you don’t lose any important information.

You have now completed the auditing procedure in its entirety. It is possible that, despite all of your checks and double-checks, there are still some problems on your website. As previously said, the most effective method of identifying these issues is to get feedback from your visitors. They will provide you bug reports at no cost to you. All you have to do is make it as simple as possible for people to report the incidents. You may either ask people to comment or send you an email, or you can create a bug reporting form that they can use to report bugs.

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A Final Note on Website Redesigning

If you don’t have a plan, it might be difficult to revamp your website without compromising your SEO rankings. Make certain that you have completed your research before deciding to create a fresh design for your website. Maintain both the staging environment and the new production environment under constant observation. Remove any issues that you discover on the staging site before launching the new design on the live site. You’ll also need to conduct audits on a regular basis until you’re confident that there are no faults remaining in the system.

If you want to learn more about marketing your website before it goes live, this comprehensive tutorial will teach you how. Consider giving us a like on Facebook and following us on Twitter to stay up to date with the newest WordPress tutorials while you’re here.

Website Redesign: A Guide to User-Centric Redesign

Learn more about website makeover in our guides section. Return to the guidelines page A step-by-step instruction on how to revamp a website keeping the end user in mind. Since you’re here, it’s likely that you’re in the midst of a website makeover, or at the very least considering one. Perhaps your website is looking obsolete and you believe it is time to make a change, or perhaps you have a problem with stagnating traffic and declining conversions that you would like to address by rethinking the user experience.

This tutorial is intended to assist you in completing a successful makeover.

In this chapter, we cover the six core questions and six must-haves of a customer-centric redesign; in chapter 2, we walk you through a step-by-step research framework to help you collect the customer-centric insight you need; and in chapter 3, we share some dos, don’ts, and tips about website redesign that we’ve learned from our own experience and that of other UX, web design, and optimization professionals.

What is a website redesign?

Learn more about website redesigning by visiting our guides section. Retour à la liste des guides A step-by-step instruction on how to revamp a website keeping the user in mind. We may assume that you’re in the midst of a website overhaul, or that you’re at the very least thinking about it. For example, your website may be old and you believe it is time to update it, or you may be experiencing stagnating traffic and decreased conversions that you would like to address by revamping the user experience on your website.

Using this tutorial, you will be better prepared to complete a successful redesign project.

In this chapter, we cover the six core questions and six must-haves of a customer-centric redesign; in chapter 2, we walk you through a step-by-step research framework to help you collect the customer-centric insight you need; and in chapter 3, we share some dos, don’ts, and tips about website redesign that we’ve learned from our own experience and that of other UX, web design, and optimization experts.

Website redesign vs website refresh

First and foremost, a little piece of semantics to ensure that you are at the correct location.

The number of changes you make during the process, as well as the scope of those changes, determine whether what you’re doing counts as a redesign or a refresh:

  • A redesign of a website typically entails considerable changes to the coding and aesthetic presentation of the website. Suppose a new visual identity and branding are introduced, pages are redesigned user experience (UX)-wise to accommodate new modules and functionality, the information architecture is modified, and a new CMS (content management system) is introduced—and all of this goes live at the same time. When the essential structure and functionality of a website remains mostly unchanged and only small modifications are implemented, this is referred to as a website refresh. The design and feel of the site, for example, may be modified with a new color palette and font, or tiny user-experience adjustments may be introduced to particular page layouts.

When it comes to how resource-intensive they are, a redesign and a refresh are very different, but they have one important thing in common: both of them will have a big influence on your consumers and their experience with your website. It is considerably less essential how you go about your project than what you label it at the end of the day. In order to get started, we need to ask a few questions.

6 questions to ask before a website redesign

In order to improve the usability of your website, you must conduct extensive research. This is the greatest approach to determine what is and is not working on your website, as well as to learn more about your target clients and how to make your website more user-friendly. You must be able to answer the following questions about your present website and clients before you can even consider a redesign (or refresh) of your website:

  1. In order to improve the usability of your website, you must conduct extensive research. This is the greatest approach to determine what is and is not working on your website, as well as to learn more about your target clients and how to make your site more user-friendly. You must be able to answer the following questions regarding your present website and clients before you can even consider a redesign (or refresh) of your existing website:

Don’t get too worked up if you don’t have the answers right immediately. We’ll use the remainder of this chapter to go through them and assist you in developing a website redesign plan, so you can be certain that you’re redesigning your website for the correct reasons and tackling it in the most effective way. However, as a cautionary tale, the following is an example of what not asking these questions might result in:

The 6 things you need to know before and during a website redesign

When it comes to approaching, and then going through, a website makeover, there are six things you should know:

  1. Identifying the most useful pages on your website
  2. Who is visiting your website, and why are they doing so? What motivates or discourages your consumers
  3. In what ways the redesign will have an influence on your team or business
  4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and how to use them to monitor success What should be changed—and how should it be tested

1. know what your website’s most valuable pages are

Consider the website redesign process in the same way that you would a home renovation. You wouldn’t begin a remodeling project by swinging your hammer in all directions and knocking down walls without first determining whether or not the walls were load-bearing first. Additionally, before beginning a website redesign, you should have a clear map of your website’s ecosystem, scope out your wireframes, and understand which pages must be handled with care and which pages may be pulled down and rebuilt from the ground up from the beginning.

Depending on how the two are connected, each of your website pages will fall into one of four groups, as follows:

  • When it comes to your company’s website, the most precious and valuable pages are those with high conversion and traffic: any mistake you make here could have disastrous consequences, which is why you must approach them with caution and 10x more care than you would with the rest of your website’s redesign. Pages with a high conversion rate but low traffic volume: These pages are significant because of the conversions they generate, even if they don’t receive a lot of traffic at the moment, which means you must proceed with caution so as not to disrupt everything that is already in place. Traffic to these pages is high, yet conversions are low, suggesting that something is wrong with the pages’ conversion rate. Design with the goal of improvement in mind: because you are not jeopardizing conversions with the changes you make, you can afford to be more experimental than in the previous two categories
  • Redesign while keeping the goal of improvement in mind Low-traffic, low-conversion pageschanges to these pages are unlikely to be noticed due of the low traffic, and you aren’t putting your conversions at danger anyhow. You may redesign these pages as often as you like because they are the least vulnerable on your site.

Understand which pages must be retained and treated with care will help you get the most out of your website redesign while ensuring that you a) don’t disrupt anything that is already operating well and b) don’t negatively impact conversions. It’s easy to accomplish. Your biggest buddy is Google Analytics (or any other conventional analytics program you employ on your website). Your most valuable pages (those with the greatest traffic and/or best conversion rates) are identified in the second chapter of this tutorial, which walks you through the process step-by-step.

2: Know who is visiting your website, and why

In our opinion, one of the most ignored aspects of a website redesign is the identification of the most value pages on the site. However, simply identifying the most significant sites is only half of the story; you also need to know who is visiting them and why they are there. According to a Google study conducted a few years ago, there are four primary forms of purpose that bring users to a website: ‘I want to know’, ‘I want to go’, ‘I want to do’, and ‘I want to purchase’.

In this scenario, website users may be visiting your site because they are looking for something specific.

  • Are interested in learning more about your company or its goods
  • Want to get in touch with you (for example, by locating a real location where they may meet you)
  • In need of assistance in completing a task involving one of your products
  • Are prepared to make a purchase from you

These are two very distinct reasons for visiting a website, and creating with your consumers in mind involves understanding the intent or ‘driver’ that brought them there in the first place. One method is to develop customer personas, which are semi-fictional representations of your actual and ideal consumers that are based on real-world demographic and psychological information. Personas assist you in determining the following with a high degree of clarity:

  • These are two very distinct reasons for visiting a page, and designing with your consumers in mind involves understanding the intent or ‘driver’ that brings them to that page in the first place! Create consumer personas, which are semi-fictional representations of your actual and ideal customers that are based on genuine demographic and psychological data, is one method of accomplishing this goal. Using personas, you can make the following decisions with a high degree of confidence:

What to do and how to do it In the event that you have never established personas previously, you may begin by implementing on-site surveys on your website pages and gathering valuable information from your clients about what brought them to your site in the first place: More information may be found in this guide to create a user persona in four simple stages (PDF).

3: know what propels or stops your customers

Instructions on how to do it In the event that you have never established personas before, you can begin by installing on-site surveys on your website pages and gathering valuable information from your clients about what brought them to your site in the first place. If you need more information, see this tutorial to constructing a user persona in four simple stages.

  • People get trapped and have problems in these situations. On individual pages, you can see what’s working and what isn’t. When it comes to the entire experience, what individuals enjoy and hate are discussed. Whether or not your present CTAs are effective
  • Whether or not the experiences change between mobile devices and desktop computers
  • What’s almost preventing individuals from converting is the following: What is it that is causing uncertainty and irritation

Why is this important: if you are unable to make the connection between the behavior of your customers and the performance of your website, and if you are unable to distinguish between elements that work and elements that don’t, you will be unable to determine what should be kept and what should be removed or re-thought—and you may end up replicating many of the existing problems in the new design.

Creating a map of your website’s behavior requires combining insights from traditional analytics (think Google Analytics) and internal sources (such as your success/sales teams, chat logs and customer interview transcripts) with those obtained from specializedbehavior analytics software.

  • The use of website heatmaps and session recording can assist you in seeing the real behavior and interactions of your clients with various pages and parts.

Input widgets and off-site surveys, which users can utilize to provide in-the-moment feedback about what’s working and what isn’t with a certain page—or even the entire site—are becoming increasingly popular. Note: The second chapter of this book has a design research framework that will assist you in bringing together personas, obstacles, drives (such as budget constraints), and hooks in a simple one-page template that you can distribute with your team:

4: know how your team will be impacted—and get them involved early on

Instead of doing the traditional company-wide grand reveal of the revamped website once everything is finished, try including individuals earlier in the process. Everything in your company is affected by your website, and everyone who works with it (and with consumers) should be aware of the changes that are taking place. As an illustration:

  • It may be more effective to include people early in the process, rather than waiting until the website redesign is complete and then announcing it to everyone in your organization. Everything about your company is affected by your website, and everyone who works with it (and with consumers) should be informed of what’s going to happen in the next months. As an illustration, consider:
  • It will be the responsibility of the content and copywriting teams to make changes to existing text and editorial choices. They will need to know where their new material will be presented and how much space they have to work with. To ensure that nothing breaks on a website and that existing search engine rankings don’t sink once the redesign is launched, the SEO (search engine optimization) and development teams will want to supervise the technical components of the redesign, which may include a potential URL movement. Sales representatives may be using the website to acquire target leads at the moment, and they will need to be familiar with its newly revised structure.
  • Success is a result of collaboration. Team members will need to be aware of where to guide clients who are searching for information or assistance with an issue
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Helping you achieve your goals Customers seeking information or assistance with an issue will require teams to understand where to lead them.

5: Know how to measure success with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

For businesses who sell their products or services online, measurements that are tied to your bottom line are the most reliable approach to determine whether your improvements were effective.

They come right to the point: did your redesign result in increased revenue for the company? Revenue-related KPIs are directly tied to the goal of your redesign: to develop a website that your target clients will like visiting and, as a result, will purchase from. They are as follows:

  • Conversions
  • Conversion rate
  • Revenue
  • Average order value (AOV)
  • Customer lifetime value (CLV)
  • And other metrics.

When evaluating the effectiveness of your redesign, qualitative measures can be used as well. As an illustration:

  • Is there a drop in the volume of support questions/tickets following the redesign? Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT)
  • Net Promoter Score (NPS)
  • Customer Effort Score (CES)

Why is this important: without clearly defined key performance indicators (KPIs), you will be unable to determine a) whether or not your website redesign was successful, and b) by how much.

6: Know what to change—and how to test it

You won’t be able to establish a) whether or not your website redesign was effective and b) by how much if you don’t have well defined key performance indicators (KPIs).

  1. Experiment with relocating the video on your homepage (which previous clients have already stated they loved) above the fold to see how well it works. If that is successful. Check to see whether social proof makes a difference in the number of conversions on your checkout page. If that’s the case. Continue with another modification

If you don’t have enough traffic or an A/B testing tool set up, there are other options for determining the effectiveness of a few website designs. For example, you could consider holding moderated usability testing sessions, both in-person and remotely, where you show your new page(s) to real people, get them to interact with it, and ask them questions about their experience and any obstacles they’re encountering along the way. Why is this important: a small number of landing pages are likely to account for the majority of your traffic and conversions.

So choose the most significant concept that emerged from your study, test it, put it into action if necessary, and then go on to the next one.

Those are the ones from which to begin your journey.

Final thought: a website redesign is never really done

However, if you don’t have enough traffic or an A/B testing tool set up, there are other methods you can use to evaluate the effectiveness of a few website designs. For example, you could consider holding moderated usability testing sessions, both in-person and remotely, where you show your new page(s) to real people, get them to interact with it, and ask them questions about their experience and any obstacles they’re encountering. Because a few of landing pages are likely to account for the majority of your traffic and conversions, it is critical to understand how they are constructed.

Decide which of your research’s most significant ideas you’ll pursue further, then test them and put them into action if necessary before moving on to the next.

Add your test hypotheses and alterations to the first column of the page, rate them across the sheet, and choose the concepts that received the highest’result’ score to proceed with.

FAQs about website redesigns

Redesigning your website is sometimes inevitable, and you will have to do so sooner or later. As a result, your website is frequently the first place where potential customers discover about your product(s) or service (s). As a result, every redesign effort has one thing in common: it is a redesign project. Whether you’re rebranding, making your website more mobile-friendly, upgrading the style and feel, or switching to a new content management system, the objective is to make your present website better.

Redesigns, on the other hand, should not be shunned or feared.

Unfortunately, some firms adhere to a misguided, out-of-date perspective on SEO, which results in website redesigns losing their SEO value and, as a result, experiencing significant visitor losses.

The key issue here is how certain people approach search engine optimization (SEO).

Because SEO strategists do not manipulate Google, but rather optimize websites in a way that makes their worth visible to search engines, you will never have to worry about a redesign negatively impacting your site’s SEO again.

How to Redesign a Website Without Losing SEO: Step by Step Checklist

Marketers that have developed hundreds of websites and have gained valuable knowledge in how to avoid common mistakes will teach you how to remodel a website without compromising search engine optimization (SEO). For your convenience, we’ve broken down this complicated procedure into seven simply digestible steps.

Step 1. Involve SEO at the Sitemap

The first step in a successful redesign process is to plan ahead of time. Prior to constructing a staging site, you should sketch out the overall layout of the new website. And there is no better approach to revamp a website in such a manner that organic results are improved than by adding SEO from the beginning. Crawl the domain with a tool such as Screaming Frogand add every internal URL to a spreadsheet to have a thorough grasp of the pages already on the website. However, do not stop there.

  1. Tip of the day: If you’re looking for a way to save money, consider donating to a good cause.
  2. If you need to make changes to the URL slugs, this spreadsheet will come in helpful at step five, when you are setting up the redirections.
  3. An architectural sitemap is a diagram that shows how a URL will appear on a website in its exact form.
  4. This is something that we like to do using Google spreadsheets.
  5. This is accomplished through the use of a tool calledslickplanto.

Step 2. Perform Keyword Research

Creating a plan is the first step in every successful redesign process. The framework of the new website should be planned before you begin building a staging site. The best method to rebuild a website such that it boosts organic results is to incorporate SEO into the design process from the beginning. Scrutinize a domain with a tool such asScreaming Frogand put every internal URL to a spreadsheet to gain a thorough overview of the pages already on the site. Nevertheless, do not rest on your laurels.

Tip of the day: If you’re looking for a way to save money, consider donating to a worthy cause.

During step five, while setting up redirects, this spreadsheet will come in helpful if the URL slugs need to be changed again.

The URL will appear on the website in the same manner that is planned by the architectural sitemap.

This is something we like to do with Google spreadsheets. It is a more user-friendly depiction of a website’s navigational structure than a traditional sitemap. This is accomplished via the usage of a tool called SlickPlant.

Step 3. Build a Staging Site

We develop the staging site when we have finished planning the new website. However, you do not wish to rebuild a website on the existing site, but rather wish to create a clone of the website or to begin developing from scratch on a temporary URL while working in the development environment. You’ve completed all of the SEO groundwork at this stage. The material is then loaded, the site is rebuilt, and if any adjustments or new features are required, they are implemented by developers. In light of the fact that we have previously prepared the most crucial on-page SEO aspects, page speed is the only other important ranking factor to keep in mind at this point.

  1. In order to do this, you want each image’s size to be no greater than required — not even one pixel larger.
  2. Take it a step further and compress the image as a result.
  3. As a result, utilize this as a decent rule of thumb, but make your own decisions about whether it is worthwhile to sacrifice quality.
  4. Additionally, if feasible, JPGs should be used in place of PNGs to ensure consistency.
  5. Only when we require a translucent backdrop do we resort to using PNGs instead.

Step 4. Perform an SEO Audit on the Staging Site

The website is subjected to an SEO audit before it is launched or provided to the customer for approval before it is launched. This audit is comparable to one that we would run on a live site, but it has been tailored to meet our web development workflow. Among the things we look for during this audit are the following:

  • Making certain that all of the pages in the SEO sitemap are included
  • Ensure that each page has a unique Meta Description and an optimal SEO title by inspecting all pages. Optimized pictures (including file size, file name, dimensions, titles, and alt text) are checked on all sites, notably blogs. Checking all pages to ensure that the Page Title/H1 has the most relevant keyword phrase for the page (for example, DUI Lawyer rather than DUI)
  • And After changing the Page Title/H1, make sure that the Menu and Sidebars are updated to reflect the new title/h1 and to include the best keyword or phrase from the previous title/h1. Testing all pages to ensure they have the right heading hierarchy (the page title is an H1, and the content headings are either H2 or H3) Examining the Yoast SEO Setup, which includes the sitemap
  • Internal redirects that can be avoided are being looked for. Examining the new site to confirm that all eligible blogs have been transferred over to it, with specific attention paid to any freshly published blogs
  • Checking the General Settings box to:

Checking the Permalinks in the Settings Common PreferencesSelect the name of the post Content Rebranding User nicknames and public display names to reflect the brand name Test/lorem ipsum pages and posts that should not be live are being looked for.

Step 5. Add Redirects

This is something we undertake as part of the SEO audit, but it is so vital that it deserves to be covered in its own area. It is preferable to keep the URLs consistent wherever feasible. This avoids the possibility of ranking loss as a result of redirection — however this is not always practicable. Sometimes the old URLs terminate in.html and must be updated, or they do not adhere to best standards, such as being too long or not being user-friendly, and must be changed. URLs such as the following are examples of URLs that may need to be updated:

  • Website.com/service.html website.com/service/ may be replaced with website.com/service/
  • Website.com/2019/07/20/post-name/ may be replaced with website.com/post-name/
  • Website.com/?p=27 may be replaced with website.com/?p=27 Perhaps website.com/page-name/ should be used instead
  • Alternatively, websitte.com/unwieldy, overstuffed, keyword filled URL that isn’t user pleasant and gets chopped off when referred to by others should be used instead. It is possible to alter the URL to website.com/keyword-optimized-url/.

If you make any changes to your URL, the single most critical thing you can do to ensure that your SEO value is preserved is to include a redirect. Failing to include redirects is the second most common and obvious cause for a website redesign to suffer from poor SEO performance, behind only the failure to remove the no-index tag. These new URLs will be treated by Google as new pages, even if the content of the existing pages remains unchanged. Google will crawl and index them as new pages. Your old URLs will stay in the index for several weeks or months, directing readers to a 404 error page in the meantime.

Compare the list of old URLs you produced in step one with the new website you built in step two.

Any time one of the URLs changes in any way, you’ll want to establish a redirect to the new URL to ensure that no one is misdirected. This is accomplished through the usage of the bulk upload option in the redirection plugin.

Step 6. Run a Post-launch SEO Audit

We do a post-launch SEO audit that is identical to our pre-launch SEO audit; however, because web builds frequently go through many QA stages, minor differences may occur between our SEO assessment and launch. It’s usually a good idea to give yourself an additional 15 minutes and double-check the live site to make sure everything went through as smoothly as possible. Among the things we look for during this audit are the following items:

  • We do a post-launch SEO audit that is identical to our pre-launch SEO audit
  • However, because web builds frequently go through many quality assurance stages, minor differences may occur between our SEO assessment and launch. If you have 15 minutes extra, it’s usually a good idea to check the live site to ensure everything went through without a hiccup. When doing this audit, some of the items we look for are as follows:
  • Check for 404 Errors
  • Look for Internal 301 Redirects that might be avoided
  • And check for other issues. Check for No Response problems – do not pay attention to any Connection Refused or Blocked messages. Examine the H1s for any that are missing, numerous, duplicate, too lengthy, or too short
  • Check for H2s that are missing, duplicated, or that are either too long or too short. Ensure that there are no duplicate Meta Descriptions and that the description is neither too long or too short. Inspect for any omitted Alt Text

Obtain DNS and HTTPS resolve and verification information. Check developer sites are configured to no-index; verify production sites are set to index. *The single most critical thing to check once a site has gone live is that it is indexable by search engines. When rebuilding your website, this is the most common and apparent error you can do, therefore avoid it at all costs.

Step 7. Monitor Site Performance

The final phase in the process is to keep track on how well the site is performing. You’ll want to validate the website in Search Console, and you’ll want to check under IndexCoverage on a regular basis to make sure there are no problems or URLs that should be indexed that are being excluded from Google’s index that should be. If you haven’t already, you’ll want to submit a sitemap to Google, which will force the search engine to scan your website and identify any redirects or new URLs you’ve added.

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