How To Add Structured Data To Your Website? (Best solution)

How to Add Structured Data to a Website

  1. Open Google’s Structured Data Markup Helper.
  2. Select your data type and enter the URL.
  3. Highlight page elements and assign data tags.
  4. Create the HTML.
  5. Add the schema markup to your page.
  6. Test your markup with Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool.

What is structured data in website?

Definition. Structured data is any data that lives in a fixed field within a file. Within the world of SEO, structured data is the markup that helps search engines understand how to interpret and display the content.

Where do you put structured data?

The data can be placed anywhere. From Google’s documentation: The data, enclosed within the <script type=”application/ld+json”> </script> tags as shown in the examples below, may be placed in either the <HEAD> or <BODY> region of the page that displays that event.

How do I add structured data to WordPress?

How to add Structured Data Markup to WordPress

  1. Open up a post, a page or a custom post type where you want to include your newly built Structured Data.
  2. Switch to the HTML-Editor by clicking the “Text” tab in the upper right corner.
  3. Include your code from above (including the surrounding <script> -Tags.

How do I access structured data?

Structures store data in containers called fields, which you can then access by the names you specify. Use dot notation to create, assign, and access data in structure fields. If the value stored in a field is an array, then you can use array indexing to access elements of the array.

Is JSON structured data?

JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is an open-standard data format or interchange for semi-structured data. It is text-based and can be read by humans and machines. It is an alternative to XML for semi-structured data because it can deliver more tightly compacted object representations.

Is HTML structured data?

HTML is semi structured. It contains tags and elements with definitive properties and hierarchies. However, the order and number of those tags varies from document to document. HTML is semi-structured, because we can organize different kind of data in tags.

What is structured data with example?

What is Structured Data? Structured data is a standardized format for providing information about a page and classifying that content on the page; for example, on a recipe page, what are the ingredients, the cooking time, the temperature, the calories, and so on.

Does structured data help SEO?

Structured data is important for SEO because it’ll make it easier for Google to understand what your pages and your website are about. Google needs to find out what a page is about to show it in the search results. Using structured data is like talking to Google, telling Google what your site is about.

Does structured data need to be in the head?

In response, Mueller says “yes.” JSON-LD structured data can absolutely be inserted in either the head or body of the page. Just as the person who submitted the question assumed – it will work fine either way.

How do I add a structured schema data?

How to Use Schema Markup for SEO

  1. Go to Google’s Structured Data Markup Helper.
  2. Select the Type of Data. There are several options listed.
  3. Paste the URL You Want to Markup.
  4. Select the Elements to Mark Up.
  5. Continue Adding Markup Items.
  6. Create the HTML.
  7. Add Schema Markup to Your Site.
  8. Test Your Schema.

What can Yoast do?

Yoast SEO is a WordPress plugin that improves your website’s rankings on search engines, by helping you optimize your site’s content and keywords. A lot of what Yoast SEO does is automated, but still needs your input and some planning.

What are examples of unstructured data?

Examples of unstructured data are:

  • Rich media. Media and entertainment data, surveillance data, geo-spatial data, audio, weather data.
  • Document collections. Invoices, records, emails, productivity applications.
  • Internet of Things (IoT). Sensor data, ticker data.
  • Analytics. Machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI)

Which is data structure that contain the information about a specific database?

This approach can be fused in a variety of applications, including managing collections of records in a relational database and creating an index of those records using a data structure called a binary tree. Some examples of how data structures are used include the following: Storing data.

Structured Data Markup Helper – Search Console Help

A tool called theStructured Data Markup Helper assists you in marking up items on your web page so that Google can interpret the information on the page. Once Google has a better understanding of your website data, it will be able to show it in a more appealing and innovative manner in Google Search. Markup Helper can also show you how to alter your email templates so that Gmail can display the data to your clients in new and beneficial ways if you send HTML-formatted emails to your customers.

  • The following rich snippets will appear on search results pages if you mark up the events on your website the next time Google scans your website: In the event that an email concerning your flight contains markup containing information about your travel bookings, Gmail can display this information in your desktop client or in your personal feed:

If you are not comfortable with the idea of adding code to your website, you may use theData Highlighterinstead of doing so. You should learn about structured data and how to manually add markup to your website if you are technically inclined.

Mark up a web page or email

If you are not comfortable with the idea of adding code to your website, you may use theData Highlighterinstead of doing it manually. Find out about structured data and manually add markup to your website if you have a technical background.

Mark up a web page

This tutorial will show you how to mark up items on a web page.

  1. Open the Structured Data Markup Helper by clicking on its icon. Select the Website tab from the drop-down menu. Select the sort of page on which you will be making annotations. For example, a movie page or an event page might be appropriate. You can have numerous things on a single page, but we prefer that all of the items be of the same category (for example, all movies or all events)
  2. You can also have multiple items on a single page. You may either enter the URL of an existing page or the raw HTML code for a page. When choosing a URL, make certain that the page is accessible to everyone who does not have a login. (You may check website accessibility by starting an incognito window in Chrome and attempting to view your page. If you can get to it, you’re in good shape.)
  3. SelectStart Tagging from the drop-down menu. Highlight sections of the page that contain critical information (for example, the start time on an event page), then choose the appropriate kind of information from the dropdown menu that displays (“Start time” on the event page).
  1. In the event that you have complicated date strings or are having difficulty marking your dates, see Advanced date tagging. If you need to include information that isn’t already accessible on your page, see Include missing information. For information on how to delete a tag that was produced by Structured Data Markup Helper, see Remove tags
  • Make certain to include all of the information necessary for your unique data type. A list of all potential values for each item is displayed in theMy Data Itemspane, with the required values clearly noted. For example, if you’re registering for an event, you’ll need to supply the event’s name, location, and start date. Choose Create HTML to build the page code once you’ve completed tagging all of the required data on your webpage. Select an output format from the drop-down menu. The default is JSON-LD (which is favoured by Google), but you may also select Microdata. Download the code from the output window or copy and paste it from the output window. The format of the code determines how you should utilize it:
  1. Make certain that you include all of the information necessary for your unique data type in your application. A list of all potential values for each item is displayed in theMy Data Itemspane, with the required values clearly marked. For example, if you’re registering for an event, you’ll need to supply the event’s name, location, and beginning date. Choose Create HTML to build the page code once you’ve completed tagging all of the relevant data on your webpage. Select an output format from the drop-down menu. The default is JSON-LD (which is favoured by Google), but you may also opt for Microdata. Select Download from the output box if you want to copy and paste the code. The following formats influence how you use the code:
  1. Make certain that you provide all of the information necessary for your unique data type. In theMy Data Itemspane, you will find a list of all possible values for each item, with the required values clearly noted. For example, if you are registering for an event, you must include the event name, venue, and start date. Choose Create HTML to build the page code when you’ve completed tagging all of the required data on your webpage. Select an output format from the drop-down menu. The default is JSON-LD (which is favoured by Google), but you may also pick Microdata. The code may be copied and pasted into a text editor, or it can be downloaded. The following formats determine how you should utilize the code:

Mark up an email

The following is an example of how to mark up an HTML-formatted email:

  1. Open the Structured Data Markup Helper by clicking on its icon. Select the Email tab from the drop-down menu. Select the sort of information that will be highlighted. A transportation reservation or a product order, for example. You must enter the HTML code of your email. SelectStart Tagging from the drop-down menu. Highlight the sections of the email that include critical information (for example, the reservation number for a bus reservation), then choose the appropriate information type from the dropdown menu that displays (“Reservation number”).
  1. In the event that you have complicated date strings or are having difficulty marking your dates, see Advanced date tagging. In order to include information that is not visible in your email, go to the section under “Add missing data.” For information on how to delete a tag that was produced by Structured Data Markup Helper, see Remove tags
  • Make certain to include all of the information necessary for your unique data type. My Data Itemspane displays a list of all available values with the required values highlighted in red. Google will not be able to process your email if you do not include all of the needed variables. The data adjacent to the alert icon () should be selected, and the tagging should be reviewed. Then, one of the following actions should be taken:
  • If the data has been incorrectly tagged, pick theXnext to the data. Then re-tag the information
  • After confirming that the tagging is right, choose the alert symbol itself () and then selectClear warning
  • Choose Create HTML once you’ve completed tagging in order to create an email with the HTML that you’ve created so far. Because Google favors JSON-LD, the default is JSON-LD, but you may also use Microdata as an alternative. SelectDownloador just requires that you copy and paste the HTML created
  1. The following instructions apply to JSON-LD:Copy and paste the produced code into the body of your email
  2. For Microdata: Replace your email address with the HTML code that was created
  1. Copy and paste the code created by JSON-LD into the body of your email
  2. For XML-LD: To enter Microdata, simply replace your email address with the HTML that was created

Save and resume editing a page or email

Create a bookmark for the page in your browser to preserve your markup in its present state. Structured Data Markup Helper will keep track of your current state for a month, including all markup values you have entered. Tags should be removed. You have the option of removing any or all of the tags that Structured Data Markup Helper has generated. To remove a specific tag from the list, use the following:

  1. Choose the tag that appears on the sample page or in the email
  2. To clear the tag, click Clear tag from the pop-up menu that appears when you select the tag.

Instead, locate the data in My Data Items column, place the mouse pointer over it, and then click on the X that appears to confirm your selection of the data. To remove all tags from a page, type:

  1. Instead, locate the information in My Data Items column, place the mouse pointer over it, and then click on the corresponding X that appears. All tags can be removed by using the following command.

Date tagging with advanced features Data that has been structured Markup Helper accepts dates in a variety of forms, as long as the dates include the months, days, and years in the format. By adding missing data to the page set, you may fill in any gaps in the data (such as the year) that may exist. If your sample material contains dates in a single chunk (for example, June 4, 2012), it is advised that you tag dates in a single chunk as well. Creating fewer tags will make your tagging process faster and more precise, which will benefit both you and Markup Helper.

  1. Begin tagging material in accordance with the instructions in Tag a website or Tag an email. On the Tagger page, use the mouse to choose a date from the drop-down menu. For example, choose one of the options below: the 4th of June, 2012
  2. From the context menu that appears, selectDateDate/time or range of dates/times. The date is added to the My Data Items column via the Markup Helper. To complete the tagging of a page, follow the instructions in Tag a page or Tag an email.
See also:  Why You Should Create Long-form Content (and How To Do It)?

Tagging dates in separate pieces

The date information in some content is displayed in distinct chunks or is labeled to distinguish between the different dates components. Example: A website that offers numerous events may display the month and year once at the top of the page, with exact days adjacent to each event listed underneath it. If your content contains dates that are displayed in different chunks, you will need to tag dates that are displayed in separate pieces.

It is important to note that Markup Helper does not recognize dates that are both marked in distinct portions and that provide a range of dates (such asJune 4-5and2012). Dates should be written in distinct pieces:

  1. Begin tagging data in the manner specified in Tag a page or send an email with a tag
  2. On the Tagger page, drag the mouse over a portion of a date to pick it. For example, choose one of the options below: June
  3. Select theDateAdvanceddate item from the context menu that appears after clicking on it. For example, selectDateAdvancedMonth from the dropdown menu. The date is added to the My Data Items column via the Markup Helper. You should continue to tag bits of the date until you’ve labeled all of the data that is accessible for that particular date. Complete the tagging process as outlined in Tag a website or Tag an email.

Examples of date tags

Here are some examples of dates that you may use to tag things:

  • There was only one date. You might, for example, tag any of the following items:
  • June 4, 2012
  • June 4, 2012
  • 6/4/12
  • 6/4/12- Other delimiters and four-digit years can be included in your tags as well, for example, 6-4-2012. When numerical dates are uncertain, Google makes the assumption that the first number represents the month of the year. For example, the date 6/4/12 is understood as June 4, 2012, but the date 13/4/12 is regarded as April 13, 2012.
  • On a single page, you may tag many dates. Example: If you tag an event on June 4th and again on June 6th, the event will be seen as occurring twice: once on June 4th and again on June 6th. A range of days has been specified. For instance, the dates June 4-7, 2012, are included. It is important to note that the dash (-) must be used to separate the beginning and ending days.
  • Dates and timings are included. You might, for example, tag any of the following items:
  • Wednesday, June 4, 2012 3pm- a time followed by the letters am or pm. Google employs standard business hours to interpet times that are not preceded by the letters am or pm. For example, the number 11 would be understood as 11 a.m. while the number 2 would be regarded as 2 p.m. June 4, 2012, 15:00 p.m. (military standard time)
  • On June 4, 2012, at 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) or June 4, 2012 at 3 p.m. Central Standard Time (UTC/GMT), the time is indicated by a time zone or a UTC/GMT offset
  • 2 p.m. on June 4, 2012 mor Date and time ranges with or without a date range will be discussed on June 4-5, 2012, from 2-3pm.
  • Separate dates for each day of the week. Use the advanced tagging option to tag the following different bits of text as a single date using the advanced tagging option:
  • Date: Tuesday, June 4, 2010 Year: 2013
  • 4th of June| Time:7:30pm-9:30pmand2012

Google does not recognize date ranges that have been broken up into different categories, according to the company. Some examples of non-acceptable date tags include the ones listed below:

Manually specify the date format

Markup Helper makes the assumption that the dates in your content adhere to the formatting requirements associated with the language in which the information is written. For example, if the language of a website is en-US, Markup Helper guesses that 12-06-12 refers to the 6th of December, 2012. If the language of a page is en-GB, Helper thinks that 12-06-12 refers to the 12th of June, 2012. As a result, Markup Helper is able to detect the language of the page and, consequently, the formatting rules for the date.

  1. SelectSettings from the gear icon on the toolbar. Make your selection from the Date format list in the Settings popup window. SelectSave

Fill up the blanks with missing information If there is any missing information in your sample material, such as the year of an event, you can give a value. SDM Helper will add markup for the value using structured data marking guidelines. You have the ability to add missing data at any moment, as well as alter or delete information if necessary. To fill in the blanks, make changes, or delete information that is missing:

  1. Select Fill in the blanks at the bottom of the My Data Items column with missing tags
  2. Do any of the following actions:
  • Select a tag from theSelect a taglist to use as a placeholder for a value. Then enter the value in the text box provided on the next page. Take, for example, the category Irish Traditional Music and typing it in. Existing data can be deleted by choosing theXin a text field
  • Change the value of an existing field in the text box to make changes to the data.
  1. As soon as you click Save, Markup Helper shows the given value in the My Data Items section.

Change the page language

Data that has been structured This feature allows Markup Helper to automatically recognize the language of your sample content in order to better comprehend the data included on your page. If the markup that Markup Helper generates is inaccurate, you may notify Markup Helper about the language that you’re using by specifying it directly. To specify the language by hand, type the following:

  1. SelectSettings from the gear icon on the toolbar. Select a language from the Site language list in the Settings popup window. SelectSave

What is the purpose of schema.org? In order to enhance the web by establishing a consistent vocabulary for defining the data on the online, Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! collaborated to create schema.org. You may make your HTML pages more understandable by incorporating schema.org markup in them. This will allow many firms and products, like Google search, to comprehend the information on your site. Similarly, if you include schema.org markup in your HTML-formatted email, it is possible that other email programs, in addition to GMail, would recognize the data.

Markup Helper can guide you through the process of incorporating microdata and JSON-LD.

What is the difference between JSON-LD and microdata?

When it comes to online content, Google likes JSON-LD.

Take the following JSON-LD example, which defines an event: The script has the type=”application/ld+json” and the context=”event” and the name=”Slim Whitman Tribute”, and the startDate=”2013-07-06″, and the location=”attype=”place” and the name=”Hollywood Bowl” and the script has the type=”application/ld+json” When adding JSON-LD, Markup Helper prefers to add markup to already-existing HTML elements rather than creating new ones.

In the following example, if you highlight an event with the code ash4 My Event /h4, Markup Helper adds JSON-LD to your example, which looks like this: The script has the type=”application/ld+json” with the following parameters: @context=”,” @type=”Event,” “name”: “My event,” and /script For further details, see the JSON-LD specification.

Take, for example, the following snippet of HTML that represents an event: div Bring your friends and family to see the Tiny Tim Tribute Band perform live on July 6, 2013 at the gorgeous Regency Theater!

What about the markup that I already have?

Markup Helper will go ahead and create further markup for a tag if you tag some text that has already been detected by the markup. Was this information useful? What can we do to make it better?

Create Structured Data in Four Easy Steps

Google works hard to try to understand the content on your website, and it’s getting better at it. However, you can give Google explicit instructions on how to interpret and display that content by including structured data markup on your website. Structured data markup is a type of markup that tells Google how to interpret and display content. Selected pieces of code on a website inform search engines about the sort of information that is there on that page, as well as about the attributes of that content (structured data markup).

Google will display more of your site’s functional and graphic aspects directly in search results if you include structured data markup on your site.

These improved search results are referred to as rich results, and they offer a number of advantages over ordinary search results, including more style, more photos, and, in certain situations, being featured higher on the search results page than other organic results.

In this blog post, you’ll get a step-by-step guide on how to create, test and add structured data into your web pages.

Even the most inexperienced web programmer may build structured data with the use of Google’s many web-based toolset. By highlighting and categorizing significant sections of a page’s information, such as the title, date, price, or location, Google’s Structured Data Markup Helper allows you to create a code snippet that can be used in other applications. You may choose to highlight the event description on a page and then name the highlighted material “description” so that Google will now recognize the highlighted information as part of the event’s description, for example.

Due to the fact that it does not need to be interleaved with your page’s HTML and that it may be dynamically placed into the page’s content as JavaScript code or through a widget, JSON-LD (JavaScript) is Google’s suggested markup type.

Utilizing the Microdata format requires access to the HTML of the website, but using the JSON-LD format simply requires access to the content of the page.

Step 2: Testing Structured Data

Once you’ve written your structured data code snippet, you can use Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool to check it for any problems or omissions before publishing it. The testing tool may test a code snippet or a page URL and identify extra suggested and needed characteristics to include in the structured data that the markup assistance tool was unable to identify during its first testing. Rich results can only be displayed if all of the required attributes are included in the structured data, although suggested properties are not required to be present.

Using the above example, if you provide the cooking time for a recipe in your structured data markup but do not include the cooking time on your page, Google will not use the structured data to provide rich results for the recipe.

Violation of these criteria may result in worse SEO ranks or being flagged as ineligible for rich results, depending on the circumstances.

The Manual Actions tab in Google Search Console will display a notification if you have structured data markup on your website that is in violation of Google’s requirements. If this is the case, you should take action immediately.

Step 3: Adding Structured Data to Website

According to the sort of website and content management system you use, there may be a variety of options for incorporating structured data markup into your site. Users of the WordPressSchema Plugin, the code editor, or straight into web pages as JSON-LD markup can add markup to their site (JavaScript). After you have finished adding the markup to your website, you can return to the structured data testing tool and test the URL of the page to confirm that the markup was properly inserted. You may obtain a preview of the rich results created by your structured data by using the structured data testing tool or Google’s Rich Results Test, both of which are free.

Step 4: Check Google Search Console for Results

Immediately following the implementation of structured data markup, verify your website on Google Search Console to see if Google has crawled it and detected the structured data markup. Because it can take weeks for Google to crawl and index your website, utilizing the Fetch as Googlebot function in Google Search Console can assist you in getting your structured data markup crawled more quickly and efficiently. A list of the different types of markup on your website, as well as any mistakes that may be related with that markup, will be displayed on the Structured Data tab.

After everything is said and done, while terminology like “JSON-LD” and “code markup” are unlikely to elicit feelings of comfort, developing structured data code markup could not be any simpler.

While most people consider structured data markup to be overly difficult or unnecessary, investing the effort to incorporate the code snippets into your website is a small price to pay for the opportunity to increase your brand’s search engine optimization and exposure in search results.

Vladimir Jones is Colorado’s first independent integrated advertising agency.

A Beginner’s Guide to Structured Data for SEO

Structured data is one of the most confusing concepts for SEO novices and professionals alike, and for good reason. If you spend more than five minutes looking into it, your brain will begin to whirl with utter bewilderment, and you will swear that you will never look into it again. This is a huge oversight. Structured data, when used appropriately, has the potential to take your website to a whole new level. And we’re here to teach you how with our beginner’s guide to structured data for search engine optimization!

The purpose of this article is to guide you through what structured data is (in language that you will really understand! ), why it is so advantageous to your website, and to provide you with some useful tools to make things even simpler for yourself.

What is structured data for SEO?

Using structured data, also known as schema markup, on your website can assist search engines better comprehend your material, allowing them to show your content for relevant queries. It also informs search engines about the most essential sections of your content—and which ones should be prioritized—as well as how to show them in the most visually pleasing manner on search engine results pages. Consider the following scenario: you have hundreds of recipes on your site. When you search for them on Google, they appear in the same manner that any other webpage could appear in the search engine results pages: Your recipes, on the other hand, can be shown in an entirely different way if they contain structured data: People searching for macaroni cheese recipes will find these examples particularly useful because Google has taken the most important elements from the recipe pages—ratings, cooking times, and ingredients—and displayed them as rich results for the convenience of those searching for macaroni cheese recipes.

See also:  How To Create Mobile-friendly Content? (Correct answer)

So, so you know what structured data is and what it accomplishes, but what does structured data look like in practice?

These tags are made up of vocabulary and syntax, or words and grammar, as the context requires.

The combination of schema.org and JSON-LD is the most favored among SEOs and Google, and it is also the most widely used.

htmlheadtitleMacaroni Cheese /titlescript type=”application/ld+json”,”datePublished”: “2021-08-09″,”description”: “This macaroni cheese is quick, easy, and utterly delicious!”,”prepTime”: “PT90M”/script/headbodyh2 Macaroni cheese recipe /h2/pem by John Doe, 2021-08-09 /em/ Time required for preparation: 90 minutes/p/bodyhtml If you haven’t had much experience working with code before, or if you aren’t the biggest lover of it, this may appear to be a daunting task.

Take heart though, you’ll be able to adapt as quickly as a duck to water in no time!

Why is structured data so important?

Those of you who despise the thought of working with coding are undoubtedly seeking for justifications to avoid incorporating structured data into your website’s content. Unfortunately, we’ve identified a few critical reasons why you should begin utilizing it as soon as possible.

It helps Google… to help you

In life, context is critical to everything you do, and it’s much more critical when it comes to reading internet information. If you include structured data on your website, Google will be able to better comprehend what your website is about and will be able to index it much more quickly as a result.

Your website’s discoverability will improve as a result of this insight. If a search engine understands the subject matter of your material, it will be able to match it to relevant user searches, resulting in more traffic to your website and an improvement in your search engine rankings.

It helps you take up more real estate

It’s important to do everything you can to stand out from the competition and attract potential consumers to your website when it comes to the search engine results pages (SERPs). The most effective approach to accomplish this is to dominate the search engine results pages (SERPs). If your material is organized, you have a higher chance of bringing it to life through rich results (featured snippets, carousels, and knowledge boxes), which will allow you to take up more space on the SERPs and outperform your competition.

It can help you show up for voice search

Adding structured data to your website, as we highlighted when looking at the best methods to optimize your pages for voice search, may also improve your chances of ranking highly for voice search queries.

It works wonders on your metrics

If your material appears in rich results, it is likely to include the following:

  • Increase the number of people who visit your website by increasing your click-through rates. Increase the number of conversions you receive.

Including structured data in your text has several benefits that cannot be overstated. When you factor in the fact that it won’t take much work on your part to put it into action, you’ll find that you have absolutely nothing to lose by taking the leap.

Types of structured data for SEO

Until far, we’ve concentrated on recipes as an example of structured data, but make no mistake: recipes are not the only sort of structured data accessible! For your convenience, there are hundreds of schema markups available to you. Let’s have a look at a few of examples, shall we?

Organisation schema markup

This markup is used for organisations—like schools, corporations, clubs—and will typically contain information like:
  • Description of the company
  • Logo
  • Contact information
  • Location(s)
  • Social media platforms
  • And more.
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬“@type”: “Organization”,“address”:,“email”: “secretariat(at)google.org”,“faxNumber”: “(33 1) 42 68 53 01”,“member”:,“alumni”:,“name”: “Google.org (GOOG)”,“telephone”: “(33 1) 42 68 53 00”}/script

Person schema markup

This markup is used for people—alive, dead, undead, or fictional—and will typically contain information like:
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬script type=”application/ld+json”,“colleague”:,“email”: “mailto:[email protected]”,“image”: “janedoe.jpg”,“jobTitle”: “Professor”,“name”: “Jane Doe”,“telephone”: “(425) 123-4567”,“url”: “ colspan=”2″>

Local business schema markup

This markup is used for a local business or branch of an organisation—like a restaurant, food chain, club—and will typically contain information like:
  • Service options
  • Location
  • Address
  • Hours of operation
  • And contact information are all provided.
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬script type=”application/ld+json”,“aggregateRating”:,“name”: “GreatFood”,“openingHours”:,“priceRange”: “$$”,“servesCuisine”:,“telephone”: “(408) 714-1489”,“url”: “ colspan=”2″>

Product schema markup

This markup is used for any product or service that you’re offering—like items of clothing, tickets, online streaming—and will typically contain information like:
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬script type=”application/ld+json”,“description”: “0.7 cubic feet countertop microwave. Has six preset cooking categories and convenience features like Add-A-Minute and Child Lock.”,“name”: “Kenmore White 17” Microwave”,“image”: “kenmore-microwave-17in.jpg”,“offers”:,“review”:}/script

Article schema markup

This markup is used for articles—news articles, investigative reports or general blog posts—and will typically contain information like:
  • Title, image/video screenshot, website name, publishing date, and social media shares are all required.
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬script type=”application/ld+json”,“interactionType”: “ “1203”},],“name”: “How to Tie a Reef Knot”}/script

Event schema markup

This markup is used for events occurring at a specific time and location—like concerts, webinars, festivals, lectures—and will typically contain information like:
Click here to see Schema.org’s example of this markup⏬script type=”application/ld+json”,],“image”:,“name”: “Foo Fighters”,“track”:,“subjectOf”:}}/script

This is only a drop in the ocean of structured data, after all! There are schemas for anything from reviews to accommodations to tourist attractions to research organizations and everything in between. You can find the complete list here.

How do I implement structured data?

It is not necessary to be a web developer or a heavy coder in order to apply structured data across your website, despite the fact that it may appear difficult at first glance. Simply follow the instructions outlined below and gain the benefits!

1. Pick your schema markups

To begin making modifications to your website, you must first establish which sorts of schema markups you intend to utilize and how you intend to implement them. It’s not as simple as just choosing one at random; it has to be appropriate for the page you’re adding it to as well as the overall purpose of the user. The easiest place to start is schema.org, where you may browse through the numerous types of schema markups that are accessible. If you wish to employ structured data exclusively for the purpose of obtaining rich snippets, you should examine Google’sSearch Gallery first to determine which sorts of structured data they like.

Don’t forget your competitors!

Because you have not yet put structured data on your website, it does not follow that your rivals have not done so as well. To do so, have a look at your rivals’ websites to see which markups they are using; this will give you a better notion of the markups you should be employing on your own website. To do so, you may look them up in the search engine results pages (SERPs) and utilize the schema.org validator tool to see what precise markups they’re utilizing. As an illustration, we searched for “espresso makers” on Google and discovered the John Lewis espresso maker from our product schema example from earlier in this article: We then pasted the URL into the validator tool, where we discovered a total of four markups: WebPage, Organization, WebSite, and Product (see below).

Make a note of any markups that could be relevant to your website and repeat the process with your rivals.

2. Make a spreadsheet

Let’s face it, we’re a little bit addicted with utilizing spreadsheets in the majority of our operations. To their credit, though, they do a good job of keeping things organized and neat. We’d recommend generating a spreadsheet with three columns, which would look like this: You will create a list of all of the webpages that you believe might benefit from structured data in the first column of the table. You may either put them in descending order of significance or, if you’re looking to get everything done as soon as possible, you can list them in any order.

Again, make certain that these markups are relevant to the sites in question, or you may run into difficulties later on in the process.

3. Take action

It’s now up to you to begin incorporating your schema markups into your website’s code. Unless you have a lot of coding knowledge and are confident in your ability to change schema.org’s markups to fit your needs, we recommend that you use one of the following approaches instead.

Structured Data Markup Helper

An excellent tool provided by Google will assist you in adding structured data to an example webpage. All you have to do is select a data type, such as articles, events, or goods, and then paste the URL from your spreadsheet into the appropriate field. Following that, you’ll proceed to tag your data. What this implies is that you will click on and highlight specific areas of your material in order to define them in accordance with the markup specifications. To demonstrate this, we highlighted our article title for the ‘name’ tag and began to highlight the author’s name for the ‘author’ tag in the following example: Then all you have to do is click ‘make HTML’ and you’ll be presented with the complete structured data in JSON-LD syntax.

Schema Markup Generator

This tool, developed by Merkle, assists you in creating JSON-LD markups that include all of the needed item characteristics as well as additional information. Nothing more complicated than selecting the markup you want to make, filling up the blanks provided, and you’re done! Once you’ve completed your work, you can test it using Google’s tools (we’ll cover this in more detail in the following section) or copy it so that it may be used on your website.

Plugins

Use of a website builder such as WordPress will allow you to take use of the large number of free and commercial structured data plugins that are now accessible to you. Simply choosing one and installing it should take care of the rest; you’ll only have to fill in a few fields rather than having to manually enter the code.

You should keep in mind that if you pick one of the free plugins, its functionality may be slightly restricted in comparison to that of the commercial plugins. Before making a decision on one, we encourage that you read reviews and try with them to discover what they’re capable of.

Quick note

In the event that you choose to utilize one of the plugins or markup generators described above (or further down in our resources section), you will only be able to produce markups that are of a basic nature. You’ll need to make adjustments to the code if you want to develop anything more complex. The good news is that, if you have access to a web developer or are ready to learn as you go, this shouldn’t be an issue!

4. Test it out

When you spend several hours selecting schema markups and incorporating them into your website, it’s easy to forget about whether or not everything is operating properly. In order to find out, here are a few resources you may utilize!

Rich Results Test

This is Google’s official tool for determining whether your structured data is appropriate for inclusion in rich results by running it through the testing process. All you have to do is enter your URL, and the program will take care of the rest. In the following example, we took one of Moz’s most recent posts, “Winning the Page Speed Race,” and tested it for structured data: Clearly, all structured data on this page, including Articles and Breadcrumbs, is suitable for rich results, indicating that everything is functioning as it should.

Schema’s Validator Tool

In addition to determining which schema markups your rivals are use, this tool is useful for identifying problems in your own structured data as well as those of your competitors’. Simple fill out the form with your URL, and the program will notify you if there are any difficulties.

Google Search Console

Google Search Console is yet another tool you can use to keep track of how well your structured data is performing. Simply navigate to your Enhancements report and you’ll be able to see how well your identified schema markups are doing. As you can see, Google uses a straightforward traffic light system in this instance:

  • Green assures you that everything is in working order
  • Amber indicates that your markups are legitimate, but that there are problems with them. The color red indicates that there is a problem

When you see Green, you know that everything is OK. Amber indicates that your markups are legitimate, but that there are problems with them; and An error message is shown in red;

Top resources and tools for structured data

For the final piece of the puzzle, we’ve assembled a list of all the best resources and tools that you can use to get started with structured data for SEO—some of which we’ve previously covered, and others which are simply the icing on the cake.

Learning resources

  • General standards for structured data that must be fulfilled in order for structured data to be suitable for inclusion in search results
  • Google’s Structured Data Guidelines The Microdata Guide from Schema.org: Although this guide concentrates on Microdata, the concepts mentioned may be extended to JSON-LD
  • Structured Data for Beginners by Yoast: This free course leads you through the fundamentals of structured data and shows you how to incorporate it into your website.

Structured data types

  • Structured data types may be found on Schema.org, which has the whole list of structured data types. Search Gallery: a collection of schema markups that Google uses in its rich snippets

Structured data generation tools

  • Helper for Structured Data Markup: This is a tool that will assist you in adding structured data to an example webpage. An application that assists in the generation of schema markups (e.g., JSON-LD). An additional tool to assist you in creating JSON-LD markups is the RankRanger Schema Markup Generator. Schema Builder Plugin: This is a free Chrome extension that allows you to produce structured data for every webpage you visit.

Structured data validation tools

  • Rich Results Test: a method for determining if structured data is eligible for rich results by evaluating it against a database of structured data. The Markup Validator from Schema.org is a tool for verifying structured data on your webpages for mistakes
  • It is available for free. It is possible to use Bing Markup Validator to check whether or not structured data has been uploaded to your website.

Final thoughts

Structured data is one of the many parts of SEO that appears to be far more terrible than it actually is. It is one of the many components of SEO that appears to be far more terrifying than it actually is. Getting to the bottom of it is actually rather simple—as long as you’re prepared to put in the necessary effort to become familiar with the software and how to utilize it effectively. Including structured data on your website will help you rank higher in search results, improve traffic and conversions, and may even result in you obtaining some valuable rich snippet real estate on Google.

Short and sweet: by not using structured data, you stand to lose even more! Keep a watch on theSupersede Blog for more useful tips, methods, and guidance on the ins and outs of search engine optimization!

How to add Structured Data to your Website

Structured data, often known as schema, is a concept that has been used in SEO methods for years. In truth, it’s been around since 2011, when Google, Bing, and Yahoo! joined forces to “develop and maintain a standard set of schemas for structured data markup on web pages.” It’s been around since 2011. We’ll teach you how to add structured data to your website in the next sections, but first, let’s look at why structured data is so crucial.

Want to nail your B2B SEO strategy? Download ourfree eBooknow.

When it comes down to it, structured data is a technique for search engines to comprehend what your webpage is about so that they can present the most crucial bits to individuals who are searching for related keywords. For example, if you search for “chocolate sponge cake” on Google, you will see the following results at the top of the results page: Google has recognized your search intent and has produced a ‘featured snippet’ that includes your recipe – or at least a portion of it – as a result of your search.

Keeping this in mind, it’s reasonable to assume that if you can properly mark up your pages, even if you don’t rank in the top three for a certain search phrase, but are on page one, you have a good chance of outranking higher-ranking results if your page is picked as the featured snippet.

Additionally, with the rise in popularity of voice search, it is more important than ever to help search engines understand the information on your website, so that they can quickly and easily parse and return information to the user.

How to add structured data for dummies: the types

Structured data may be implemented in two ways: through JSON-LD or through Microdata.

Microdata

Microdata is by far the most difficult method of implementing schema, and I would recommend that you use it only if you have a decent understanding of coding. It necessitates the incorporation of code into the HTML that already exists on your website, around the information that you wish to draw the attention of Google. This is the sort of circumstance in which having a web developer on your team who understands how to add structured data, or even someone on your marketing team who knows HTML, may be really beneficial.

JSON-LD

If you have Google Tag Manager installed on your website, JSON-LD is by far the most straightforward method of adding structured data to your page; all that is required is that you insert code into the page’s header – which is a relatively simple process if you have Google Tag Manager installed on your website.

JSON-LD does not require any markup to be applied to the text on your page, thus if the information that you wish to offer to Google is not already there on your website, you may actually utilize JSON-LD to include it.

How to add structured data for dummies: the tools

When it comes to offering support for structured data, Google is outstanding — it provides two primary tools that show you how to add structured data to your website: the Structured Data Tool and the Structured Data Editor. Structured Data Markup Helper is a tool that assists with structured data markup. What if you don’t know how to code? Are you perplexed as to what needs to go where? Fortunately, the Structured Data Markup Helper is on hand to guide you through the process of adding structured data in a matter of minutes.

  1. The elements you wish to mark up on your website may be selected by highlighting them on the web page and tagging them with the required keywords. You can enter the information manually if you like.

The elements you wish to mark up on your website may be selected by highlighting them on the web page and tagging them with the necessary tags. You have the option of entering the information manually.

What is Structured Data ? And How To Add it to your Website

Structured data, often known as Schema markup, is a technological concept that can help you enhance your search engine results by giving them a boost. A little learning curve is required while working with structured data; however, no prior coding experience is required. Structured data may be used by anybody. However, if you are familiar with coding, this will be a rather quick and straightforward process for you. You should obviously become familiar with organized data and its significance.

By learning them, you will obtain a skill set that will benefit your website’s search engine results in the long run.

What is structured data?

Structured data, also known as Schema Markup, is a little chunk of code that assists search engine bots in reading the content of your website. Following that, the material is structured and shown in the search engine rankings for your website. The search engine is unable to comprehend the significance of the elements you include on your website. The search engine will treat your contact information as text, and in order for it to realize that this information is significant, you must use structured data, which specifies important content and instructs the search engine to display this information when someone searches for it.

You’ll just publish your phone number someplace on your website’s homepage, right?

If the phone number could have been shown by the search engine, it would have been easier for visitors to discover and would have required one fewer activity.

Structured data documentation may be found at schema.org, which is an open source project.

Never fear, you will not be required to learn any of these terms, and I will show you how to utilize them with little or no effort. There are several types of structured data. Structured data may be divided into three categories, according to Google.

In this case, JSON-LD is preferred since Microdata and RDFa are static formats, but JSON-LD may be dynamically put into a page of your website. Simply said, structured data in JSON-LD is easier for search engine bots to understand and more versatile for developers to use, which is why I’ll be adopting this format going forward.

Important Schema Markup Terms

In order to specify a subset of your data under a single subject, you may use the itemscope property. Consider the following scenario: you have a website dedicated to movies. Your default HTML may look something like this without any schema markup. In the initial tag of your div, you may include the keyworditemscope, and when search engines scan this part, they will know that the material is on a specific subject matter.

2. Itemtype

Your content’s itemtype will inform search engines about the nature of your material, allowing them to categorize and rank it appropriately. Itemtype markup in its simplest form. In the case of the movie example, it will instruct search engines in how to userank this data in the event that someone searches for “movie.”

3. Itemprop

The item property allows you to specify each and every property of your data that will be used in search engine ranking calculations. This will help search engines to show information on the Avatar Movie in a more organised manner.

Add Structured Data To Your Website

You can continue reading if you are like me and the millions of other people who use WordPress to power their websites; otherwise, you can go on to the next section. Let’s move on to adding structured data to your website. Adding schema markup to your WordPress website is a simple process that may be accomplished with the use of plugins. One of the plugins I particularly appreciate is the TheSchema App Structured DataPlugin. It is simple to set up and does not necessitate any further setup. After you have downloaded the plugin, navigate to your WordPress DashboardPlugins.

Once the plugin has been installed and active, you will be able to access the structured data for your pages or posts while editing them.

(This is a feature reserved for professionals.) You should become familiar with the fundamentals of structured data so that you can make any necessary adjustments to your sites and posts to get the most out of it.

For WordPress users, this is an extremely easy way that requires no additional work.

2. Any Website using Google Structured Data Markup Tool.

If you are familiar with HTML, this approach will work for all websites; nevertheless, it might be complex and time-consuming to set up if you are not. Structured Data Markup Helper is a fantastic tool provided by Google that allows you to easily add structured data to your website. It is quite simple to use; simply go to the Google Structured Data Markup webpage to get started. Select the website tab from the drop-down menu. Choose a data type from the drop-down menu. These are relatively restricted categories, but they include all of the material.

The schema markup tool is located on the right-hand side of the screen.

Choose the relevant selection; for example, in the image above, I am labeling the header with the word title.

Click on the Create HTML button located in the upper right corner of your page once you have finished tagging everything on your website page.

Copy the code snippet that was produced and paste it into your page.

Note: If you are using a content management system (CMS) or a template engine, the Google helper technique might be difficult to implement. It is necessary to determine the precise HTML portions that need to be replaced, and this will vary depending on the platform or page layout.

Adding Schema Markup yourself

If you have some understanding of schema markup and are willing to put in the effort, go ahead. It is a learning process, and with more practice, you will become more proficient. Keep in mind that if you do not have prior understanding of code, you should refrain from tampering with your files because doing so manually necessitates a high level of coding expertise.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *