How To Create A Roundup Post That Will Skyrocket Your Traffic To High Heavens? (Correct answer)

What makes a good Roundup post?

  • Since the success of your roundup post is largely dependent on contributions, it’s okay to be a little picky when it comes to the participants. Be sure that they are: Popular – As much as possible, you need people who already have an established presence in your specific niche. The bigger their readership, the better.

How do you write a good round up post?

Formatting the post is pretty simple. Include the quotes from the experts, add a headshot of theirs from their website, link to their website, and write a bio about them. You can even crib the bio from their bio on their site if you want, though it’s nice to write something a little unique.

How do you create round up?

The Easy Guide to Creating Expert Roundup Posts

  1. Step 1: Ask a Question.
  2. Step 2: Find Worthy Experts.
  3. Step 3: Contact Your Experts.
  4. Step 4: Edit/Finalize Submissions.
  5. Step 5: Publish & Promote Your Article.

How do you make an expert round up?

Now it’s time to create an expert roundup post.

  1. Step 1: Find the Right Topic and Question.
  2. Step 2: Find the Right People and Experts.
  3. Step 3: Create a List of Experts (With Contact Details)
  4. Step 4: Contact These Experts.
  5. Step 5: Put Your Roundup Post Together.
  6. Step 6: Let the Experts Know When the Post Is Live.

How do you write a round up story?

Round up stories are written in a similar way to travel guides. You don’t go into great detail about the attractions. They’re easy to write because you won’t have to do much in-depth research. Usually a sentence or two—or a paragraph or two—about each tourist attraction will suffice.

What is a curated roundup?

Content Curation Roundup Post Definition Consists of input to a single question collected from different people, often influencers or your audience. Most commonly, the information gathered is new and created specifically for the article.

What is a roundup review?

Round up posts are essentially “roundups” of great content in a particular industry or topic area. For example, “10 Brilliant Blogging ‘How-To’ Posts You MUST Read” would be a roundup of, well, 10 blogging how-to posts that other people have written.

What is product roundup?

A product roundup is an article or other form of media that features several products within a category or theme. The purpose of a product roundup is to describe and compare several similar or related products and help the reader decide what to buy.

What is a roundup email?

Roundup list emails are a fun and dynamic way to present content. Your roundup email might list top blog posts or most popular products, walk readers through a step-by-step process or timeline, show social media shares or comments from brand loyalists, or organize pretty much any kind of list you can imagine.

What is link roundup?

A link round up is basically a blog posts that features links to other people’s blog posts. Usually, you’ll find them on a weekly or monthly basis, and they are themed around a topic related to the blog that’s hosting it. You can find them in virtually any niche, too.

What is a weekly roundup?

1 happening or taking place once a week or every week.

How To Create Roundup Posts To Skyrocket Your Blog Traffic

The most recent update was made on January 13, 2021 by

Best Roundup Blog Post Tips

If done correctly, roundup pieces are one of the most effective strategies to attract traffic to your site on a consistent basis. On the blog, I’ve been talking a lot about “how-to” type stuff, such as how to interlink blog articles in order to increase traffic (Did you see how I’m employing the cross-linking strategy in today’s post?) Or this one, in which I reveal some of my favorite strategies for coming up with catchy blog article titles. Today, I really want to get back to creating content, because we all know that content is king, and I really want to do that.

I enjoy writing roundup pieces since they are simple to put together and may generate a significant amount of traffic, which is exactly what most writers need.

What I particularly enjoy about writing roundup pieces is that it provides yet another opportunity to highlight some of your previous blog entries and draw a bit more attention to them.

For those who work full-time and write on the side, this method will be extremely effective if you have a substantial amount of material in your blog library.

How do I create a roundup blog post that drives traffic?

Before we get started, if you are not already a member of my 30 Day Blogging Challenge, where we discuss some of the finest techniques for growing your blog and monetizing it for profit, you should consider signing up right now. You may find the whole set of instructions below: While we appreciate your visiting us today, and before I return to the matter at hand, which is how to produce a roundup article that attracts traffic, we would love for you to become a member of our rapidly expanding Facebook group, which you can find right here!

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Please see our complete disclaimer and policy page for more information.

What is a roundup post?

On Pinterest or Google, I’m sure you’ve all come across “Best of” blog entries, or perhaps a list of 100 kid-friendly slow cooker recipes. But, have you ever attempted to create one on your own? As in, one that is primarily comprised of your own blog content, only? In any case, even if you have already done so, I am confident that you could swiftly put up a number of other collection pieces to assist improve traffic. I’ll give you a brief synopsis of what I’m talking about in case you’re completely unfamiliar with the subject.

  1. It is possible to produce a roundup post that includes either your own content or other people’s work.
  2. Consider the following scenario: you have a cooking blog on which you post a range of recipes.
  3. Starting with an introduction to the topic, you can simply create a list of all of the recipes on your site that are related to the theme.
  4. This includes including a short paragraph describing each recipe, how it might benefit the reader, and perhaps a photo of the meal.
  5. You may use this method for whatever sort of blog you may have on the internet.
  6. And if you’re blogging about weight loss, consider writing a post on the finest weight loss ideas and strategies you’ve found.

This year, increasing blog traffic is quite simple. If you’re looking for more specific advice on how to increase blog traffic, sign up for my free blog traffic boosting recommendations right here now.

Types of Roundup Posts to Consider

I have a few of roundup entries that generate a lot of attention for my site all year long. Not only are they completely optimized for search engine optimization, but I also regularly update them to ensure that all links are still functional and that the material is always up to date with current events. Currently, I have about 6 fantastic circular entries that provide the majority of my blog traffic. In fact, this is one of the methods I use to ensure that my site receives regular traffic throughout time.

Roundup articles may be used to boost the exposure of your blog and are available in a variety of formats:

  • Round-up blog pieces from experts (see an example here, where I discuss website traffic)
  • Expert round-up videos Posts that collect your most popular material (while keeping the concept in mind)
  • Posts that compile the material of other blogs

The most effective strategy to increase your blog traffic is to encourage visitors to explore your site. Maintain their presence on your website for as long as possible. If you are able to create roundup postings of your most popular material, that would be even better! Expert roundup pieces are wonderful if you have the opportunity to interview a group of bloggers in your industry about a certain issue and provide links to their websites. When you’re finished, send them an email with a link to the blog post.

  • Every every blogger, in my opinion, should produce at least one expert blog piece over their whole career.
  • Simply search for blog roundup examples on Google or Pinterest to get started.
  • Do you work in the motherhood industry?
  • These sorts of roundup items tend to do well since they receive a large amount of traffic, shares, and comments, which is fantastic for increasing engagement.
  • Who knows, after you’ve established a working relationship with them, you might be able to discover further opportunities to cooperate with them.
  • This is a resounding no.
  • If you want to learn more about how to develop outstanding expert roundups, keep reading!

Why should you write a roundup blog post?

Writing a compilation piece of your own content is a terrific approach to resurrect previous posts that have gone inactive or have become dated but are still extremely important to your audience. In the event that you publish evergreen content on a regular basis, you should have no trouble re-promoting it when you make a roundup piece. If you just have a limited amount of time, a roundup article is a terrific method to get something out quickly. Don’t just scribble anything down and call it a day; what I mean is that you shouldn’t have to conduct a lot of research before you start writing.

All you have to do now is discover all of the connected articles that you may include in your round-up piece.

Additionally, because it leads your viewers to explore your blog, this form of material enhances blog traffic as well. Greater clicks translate into more traffic. Here are a few compelling arguments for completing your roundup piece today:

  • Increased blog traffic
  • Increased possibilities for internal linking
  • It’s quick and simple to complete
  • You will be adding additional value to your readers’ experience. You will receive more shares and comments as a result of this. You will make more money (which is great)

I hope that this alone will inspire you to put together a compilation article of your favorite blogs today! With my Blog Income Strategy tutorial, you can learn how to monetize your blog right away!

How to find topic ideas for your roundup post

It’s possible that you won’t rank for every single post you publish, but I like to give it a shot. Consider long-tail keywords that you might be able to rank for in the future. However, the first step is to come up with a theme for your article based on how many entries you may have have published on your blog. If you have a mom blog and you have a number of blog articles that are all about the same thing, start by making a list of what you have written. Basically, you should go over your blog and determine which entries you can assemble into a “best of” sort of piece.

So, returning to my mom blogger example, let’s assume your subject is about being a new mother.

  • Learn how to properly prepare for a new baby
  • How to efficiently plan for maternity leave as a new mother
  • And more. Products that are a must-have for a newborn baby
  • What are the best car seats for first-time mothers to buy? The things you need to know when you’re bringing a new baby home

And so forth. You should give it a shot if you get the idea. Look through your blog entries and create a list of posts that are thematically connected to each other. In the case of a blog with numerous themes, I find it beneficial to concentrate on one category at a time because those topics already have a loosely related theme to them. PS: If you have a number of themes on your blog, you should purchase this resource to assist you in properly organizing your blog if you write on a variety of topics.

Your new posts will be ready and waiting for your approval whenever you need to publish one of them.

What is even better is that because these pieces are such a treasure mine of knowledge on a certain topic, they are far more likely to be shared widely.

Promoting your round up post:

Now that you have completed your post, I recommend that you create a few pins that correspond to your post. At least three pins for Pinterest and two collage pins to go along with it are required. Collage pins do really well (I have a few templates of collages on myFeminine Pinterest Canva Templatesif you are interested) (I have a few templates of collages on myFeminine Pinterest Canva Templatesif you are interested). Here are some awesome places to findfree feminine stock photosfor your new epic post.

If you have an Instagram account, you can create an Instagram story to promote your most recent post. The most important step is to send it to your mailing list via email. Here are 10 more places topromote your blog for freefor massive traffic.

Other Places to Find Opportunities to Create Roundup Posts

We covered the basics of how to make an expert roundup article, as well as how to produce roundup posts using your own material, in very brief detail. What if you want to avoid going down the expert road (which you shouldn’t) but you don’t have enough links of your own to make the blog post yourself? If you don’t have all of the links you need to produce the perfect roundup posts, you may get them from other bloggers who are willing to share them. Keep your content from being merely a collection of links and photos at all costs.

The reason Google dislikes postings that appear spammy and have only a few links attached to them is because it deems them to have thin content.

In other words, if you are planning on linking to other blogs, make sure that you first obtain their permission and that you back your links with a couple of phrases (250+ words) before doing so.

Facebook roundup groups:

  • Blogger Roundups
  • Bloggers Sharing Links for Roundups
  • Blogger Round-Up Requests
  • RoundupPalooza
  • Recipe Round-up
  • CraftFood Round-Ups
  • Blogger Round-Ups
  • Blogger Round-Up
See also:  How I Gain 1,260 Instagram Followers Per Week? (The answer is found)

Continue to write your pieces as you normally would, taking into consideration the suggestions provided here. Please remember to join up for my free blog traffic increasing suggestions, which can be found right here. And you’re finished! You may go ahead and write a few round-up entries to assist increase the amount of visitors to your site. I employ this method whenever I notice that my website’s traffic is dwindling. It’s my go-to pick-me-up when I’m feeling down. Some of my finest collection entries have brought me consistent blog traffic year after year, no matter how old they are.

Nothing except updating them, checking that the links are still functioning, and maybe creating a few new pins using my Canva pin designs is all that I do anymore.

I hope you enjoyed this and you are ready to create your own epic roundup post!

Sign up for our 30 Day Blogging Challengeto build a better blog if you have not already done so if you want more excellent ideas like these, as well as guidance on how to develop your site from zero to profit. Here’s another post that can help you increase your visitors quickly:

  • Get your blog recognized in 21 different methods that are both unique and effective. 8 Blogging Tools for Beginners to Use to Earn Money from Their Blogs

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How To Create Roundup Posts To Skyrocket Your Blog Traffic

Have you ever come across an article that was a collection of links? Posts about roundups are essentially “roundups” of excellent material in a specific sector or topic area. In the case of “10 Brilliant Blogging ‘How-To’ Posts You MUST Read,” the article would be a collection of, well, ten blogging how-to posts authored by others. Among my other posts on this site are ” 9 dumb things speakers do on stage,” ” 21 Traffic Building Tips from expert bloggers,” and ” 9 stupid things speakers do on stage.” It takes a bit more effort to put up a roundup piece, so let’s start with the main question.

Why write a roundup post?

In contrast to you presenting your perspective on your blog site, a Roundup article gathers a large number of opinions and provides your visitors with a more comprehensive set of options. However, there are more benefits outside simply having a nicer post:

  • The ability to establish ties with other bloggers or authors The people you quote are driven to spread the word about your piece to their networks. You establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry
  • You are utilizing other people’s stuff, which means less effort for you
  • And

The following are the two basic techniques to drafting your first roundup piece, assuming this sounds reasonable to you. Make use of already-existing content. As you put on your Columbo trench coat, you begin to acquire tips, tactics, and insights that have previously been published elsewhere on the internet. Experts should be interviewed. This second strategy will need a little more effort, but it will result in new content that you will be able to claim as your own. If you want to publish your first book, you may interview writers for their advise on how to do so, or you might ask financial professionals to receive their best advice on saving for retirement.

Steps to Write an Amazing Content Roundup Post

All right, let’s start with the fundamentals first. Let’s get this party started.

Step1: Find some great posts

Allow me to begin by reviewing some of the essentials: Now it’s your turn.

Step2: Write the post and cite the authors

Remember to credit the writers when curating information of this nature. – After all, the whole point is to get them to (hopefully) share it with their followers, which will result in increased traffic for you. Don’t just mention “this post” or “a post I discovered,” or something like. Instead, offer something like “This post by XYZ author discusses how to do XYZ.” Mention the writers’ or blog’s names, as well as a link to their homepage, if one is provided. Keep in mind that the more professional you make the author appear, the more likely it is that they will share the piece.

Step3: Be consistent

It is not necessary to write more than one roundup article every week or month, but a consistent blog post every week or month is the most effective alternative for development. In fact, producing roundup items on a frequent basis not only helps to retain your present readers, but it also helps to attract new ones to your site.

If you publish a weekly roundup, make sure you post it at the same time each week. Your fans will begin to anticipate it and will return to it. We understand how difficult it may be to keep up with the constant stream of fresh material. We can assist you with this.

Step4: Reach out to the authors

Don’t forget to notify the writers of your article when you’ve finished writing it. You may write them an email or tag them on social media to let them know you’re thinking of them. When you’re sending an email, try something like this (with the brackets personalized): Subject: I enjoyed reading your blog article. Body: “Hey,! I’m writing to express my appreciation for your blog piece, which I found to be quite interesting. The section on was extremely interesting to me. In fact, I loved it so much that I included it in my roundup of the best of the web.

Cheers, P.S.

Another option

Who says there’s anything wrong with a little self-promotion now and then? If you have a large amount of information on your own site that is related to the topic, you should consider creating a roundup of your own entries. Here are just a handful of the reasons why this is an excellent choice:

  • Consequently, your bounce rate (the percentage of users who leave your site after visiting only one page) is reduced. It exhibits your knowledge on a certain subject
  • You may use it to introduce new followers or readers to your brand and explain what you’re all about

If self-promotion isn’t your thing, we can also assist you in promoting your weblog. Here’s how to do it.

Content Roundup Post Examples

Finally, here are a few instances of large sites that make use of content roundups to provide you with some inspiration:

  • SmartBlogger (Jon Morrow)
  • SelfHostedLife (Faizan Ali)
  • Small Business Ideas (Brian Liang)
  • SmartBlogger (Jon Morrow)

The BlogWorksAmazing Title Analyzer will provide you with a grade and comments on your headline in a short period of time. Right now, give it a go!

Conclusion

Content roundups are sometimes regarded as a low-cost method of increasing page visitors. However, if you perform things correctly, you will get authority and traffic without a doubt. As long as you just offer high-quality information and truly handpick the stuff that you display, you’ll be good, according to the experts. Will you begin creating content roundups as soon as possible? Please share them in the comments section to assist in inspiring other readers! If you enjoyed learning how to make an outstanding roundup article, you might be interested in these other posts on making great content: Ensure that your blog posts look fantastic on social media by following these steps.

10 surprisingly easy tweaks that make your site more attractive (and get more blog traffic) Originally published in February 2017, this post has been modified in May 2020 to better serve you.

Blockbuster day for corporate Canada

Thursday was a major day in the Canadian earnings season, with corporate behemoths and national treasures alike reporting their results. Here’s a rundown of everything we’ve learned thus far: Although this advertisement has not yet been loaded, your article continues below it. Manulife suffers a loss, and its chief financial officer departs. Manulife Financial Corp. reported a deficit in the fourth quarter, but the loss was overshadowed by the announcement that CFO Michael Bell is departing the business, a situation that has been described as ‘far from favorable.’ Air Canada suffers a blow as a strike vote approaches.

  1. BCE falls short of expectations An increase in profits was fueled by elements such as cellphone services, the company’s media segment, and its new Internet-based Fibe TV package.
  2. Shoppers Drug Mart Corp.
  3. The company also increased its quarterly dividend by 6 percent on Thursday.
  4. Canadian Tire is bracing for a mild winter.
  5. reported a minor decline in earnings in the fourth quarter as a result of the impact of a tax settlement, but revenues remained solid despite an exceptionally mild winter, the company said.

Teck Resources Ltd., a Canadian mining company, reported a 20 percent increase in adjusted fourth quarter earnings on Thursday, describing the increase as “substantial.” Higher metallurgical coal prices helped to offset reduced zinc and coal sales volumes in a market where commodity demand was turbulent.

In its fourth quarter earnings report, Husky Energy Inc.

Thomson Reuters has been slammed with a goodwill penalty of US$3 billion. After incurring a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of US$3 billion in the fourth quarter to account for the fall in its financial services sector, Thomson Reuters Corp announced a fourth-quarter loss.

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In Shanghai, Teahouses Offer Both Community and Solitude

In a branch of Shanghai’s Yinxi mini-chain of teahouses, a private room is available for customers to enjoy loose-leaf and powdered teas along with refreshments in a relaxed setting. Josh Robenstone is credited with this image. Ligaya Mishan is a slang term for a person who has a lot of money. Josh Robenstone was in charge of the photography. WOMEN ARE THE CENTRAL PART OF THE STORY PLAY CARDS, MAKE SMARTY FACES, AND BE IMMACULATELY DISAPPOINTED. Cigarette smoke eddies are a kind of cloud. We are in Huangpu, a key district of Shanghai with a population of over 25 million people — yet these six women are the only other customers I notice at De He Teahouse, which is located on the second level of a sports complex and is only partially visible from the street.

On the meanwhile, public meeting areas are still open and lively; I travel uncovered in the subway system, shoulder to shoulder with strangers, for example.

It is here that I find respite from the chaos of the city.

We’ve come for tea, but after we’ve ordered, we slink away from the table of women fanning their cards to the all-you-can-eat buffet — chafing trays piled high with congee, sweet corn soup, steamed taro, and luo song tang, a Shanghai adaptation of the borscht brought to the city by Russian émigrés following the October Revolution of 1917.

While it’s lovely, it’s also strangely unnecessary, almost incidental to the experience — of unexpected respite from an incessant city; of discovering a kind of hiding place in plain sight in an environment where the concept of individual privacy is contested; of paradoxically being alone while also being joined with others, all of us dedicated to our pursuit of this fleeting moment.

  1. I have no idea that, in a matter of months, places like this would close their doors all across the world, and that my world will be reduced to the confines of my own house and neighborhood.
  2. ImageCredit.
  3. TEENAGE TEA IS ANCIENT, and it is perhaps crucial to China’s conception of itself.
  4. Remains of tea leaves have been discovered in the tomb of an emperor who died in 141 B.C., and the earliest references to people drinking tea in public places date back to the Tang dynasty in the seventh to tenth centuries A.D., when tea was first introduced into China.
  5. In both intellectual tea parties and common street-side “tiger stoves,” which sold hot water for making tea at home before setting up chairs so that consumers may stay, the tradition has its origins.

This fantasy obscures the differences between China and Japan, as well as the differences between Japanesechashitsu, which is a space designed specifically in accordance with the strict aesthetics of the tea ceremony, which is less a pastime than an art, andochaya, which is where geisha entertain guests.

  • Farmers didn’t have to band together in villages because of the Chengdu Plain’s relative geographic isolation, rich soil, temperate climate, and extensive irrigation system.
  • Teahouses were an important part of the everyday lives of the inhabitants of Chengdu; in 1909, the city had 454 teahouses spread throughout its 516 streets, making it the most populous city in China.
  • Ear cleaners made their way around the room, brandishing semi-surgical instruments.
  • In a nutshell, these were far from contemplative, rarefied environments.
  • “There is frequently insufficient seating.” ImageCredit.
  • Strangers could communicate and exchange ideas in the teahouse because it served as an interface between public and private life.
See also:  How To Generate More Traffic With Google’s New Features? (Question)

The teahouse shared this freedom with the coffeehouses of 17th- and 18th-century Europe, which have been credited by the German philosopher and sociologistJürgen Habermas with helping to give birth to the Enlightenment by removing the “monopoly of interpretation” previously held by the church and the government.

  1. C.
  2. However, according to historian Qin Shao, early teahouses retained their subversive influence since they served as microcosms of both the city and the country.
  3. This was due in part to teahouses’ tacit approval of gambling, prostitution, and “the singing of obscene songs,” as well as the fact that leisure was suddenly perceived as a threat to productivity, defying modernization and the newly formalized workday.
  4. Many teahouses were forced to close during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s, when even a stray overheard comment may result in condemnation.
  5. Drinking tea, both at home and in public, has almost become a nationalistic act, an affirmation of one’s Chinese identity.
  6. De He feels down in Shanghai before the pandemic.

However, among the city’s tens of thousands of teahouses, a new vanguard suggests a shift from populist engagement to retreat and refinement, whether in settings stocked with antique furniture, as at De He, or styled in a self-consciously edgy aesthetic, as at theTingtai Teahouse, in the M50 art district in the former industrial zone of Putuo, with its tiers of private chambers in elevated stainless-steel boxes, or in Several tea houses offer high-end varieties of Bingdao Pu’er tea, Tieguanyin oolong tea, and Dianhong (a black tea from Yunnan Province in China’s southwest), which are prepared tableside by tea sommeliers.

  1. Reservations are frequently necessary, and time limitations are enforced to prevent clients from lingering for an excessive amount of time.
  2. William H.
  3. Men with suits and briefcases disappear into closed-off rooms after a quick exchange of words.
  4. One of the locations, a branch of the Yinxi mini-chain on Yuqing Lu in the former French Concession, is virtually undetectable from the outside, but for a series of pudgy, blank-faced monk dolls fitted into the wall.
  5. Tables stand cocooned in glass cylinders surrounded by water in the garden, and they can only be reached by a set of steppingstones.

The interiors of some of these establishments appeal to the younger generation; others make tea the centerpiece of their operations, with formal ceremonies requiring a skilled practitioner, or as a luxury product, with prices for particularly rare varieties reaching thousands of yuan per pot, the equivalent of hundreds of dollars in the United States.

  • Those freewheeling teahouses of old were where “ordinary folk” could gossip and express opinions, as well as “release destructive emotions and cope with social change,” without fear of repercussion or government interference.
  • Perhaps the promise is not one of engagement, but rather the polar opposite: one of retreat.
  • These two social media platforms, however, are both restricted within China by a firewall, and their closest available social media analogues, the microblog platform Weibo and the messaging app WeChat, are both closely regulated by the government.
  • When I arrive in Shanghai, some locals tell me about the pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong, which began earlier that year and were portrayed by state media on the mainland as the work of a few thugs in thrall to foreign agents.
  • We are free to express ourselves in public, but no one appears to be paying attention.
  • I’m just a tourist, a person of no significance who is passing through town.
  • According to the Center for Economics and Business Research in London, the Chinese government is even more powerful than it was previously, with the country’s economy accelerating and perhaps positioned to eclipse the United States’ economy within a decade of the country’s founding.

The most charming teahouse I’ve ever encountered in Shanghai isn’t even a teahouse in the traditional sense.

Loh is unable to locate the location, despite the fact that she has previously been; we travel past one gate, then another, until ultimately entering a room in a private residence.

Cai Wan-Ling is a tea master from Anxi, in the southeastern province of Fujian — a region famous for its oolong tea.

Zhang contends that the origins of gong fu cha were not tied to any specific philosophical meaning, despite the fact that there existed a lengthy tradition of academic connoisseurship in Chinese tea drinking that had not been formalized.

By the time Cai gets going, the question of whether chayi is an ancient or a new tradition is moot.

Gaiwan, a lidded bowl with the lid representing heaven, its saucer representing earth, and its body representing the tea server negotiating between them; the “fair mug,”gong dao bei, which is placed at a 45-degree angle from the gaiwan and into which the tea is first poured, before it is poured into each guest’s cup, so that all will receive the same concentration of tea; a small folded towel to dab spills She is aware of the exact date on which each of her teas was harvested.

  1. Here’s an oolong from Oct.
  2. She maintains a ballerina-like posture.
  3. She then raises the lid just a little to take a deep breath in.
  4. Whenever she is serving many cups of tea, she likes a ceramic teapot since the material does not impact the taste.
  5. She has a set timing for brewing each tea, down to the second, but she doesn’t look at a clock while she does it.
  6. It is this that is so amazing: knowing how to tell time merely by existing, keeping the seconds in the body, each one solid and oddly weighty, is the marvel.

We have not avoided time, but somehow managed it. She has more to tell me — how the first infusion is delicate, the second more full-bodied; how the tea cools faster in a clay cup; how she prefers to drink dark oolong on a wet day — and I lean forward to listen, for a minute lost to the outer world.

Home – The Daily Chronicle

LADIES, GIRLS, AND GIRLS-TO-BE CARDS ARE PLAYED, FACES ARE PLACED strategically, AND BORED IS EXAMPLE. The eddies of smoke produced by cigarettes We are in Huangpu, a central district of Shanghai with a population of approximately 25 million people — but these six women are the only other customers I see at De He Teahouse, which is located on the second floor of a sports complex and is only partially visible from the outside. A little over two months before the world’s first reported cases of the novel coronavirus are reported, it is October of this year.

It is here that I find refuge from the crowds: I enter through a stone gate guarded by grinning lions, cross a short bridge over koi lazing in the water, and emerge into a mausoleumesque sweep of glossy black tile and red lanterns draped with tassels.

Tea is, after all, what we’re here for, but after we’ve ordered, we slink away from the women who are fanning their cards and toward the all-you-can-eat buffet — chafing trays filled with congee, sweet corn soup, steamed taro and luo song tang, a Shanghai adaptation of borscht brought to the city by Russian émigrés following the October Revolution of 1917.

While it’s lovely, it’s also curiously unnecessary, almost incidental to the experience — of unexpected respite from an incessant city; of discovering a kind of hiding place in plain sight in an environment where the concept of individual privacy is contested; of paradoxically being alone while also being joined with others, all of us dedicated to our pursuit of this fleeting moment.

  • That venues like this will close all over the world in a matter of months, that my world will be reduced to the confines of my own home, is something I don’t yet realize.
  • ImageCredit.
  • China’s conception of itself is arguably based on the consumption of tea.
  • Remains of tea leaves have been discovered in the tomb of an emperor who died in 141 B.C., and the first references to people drinking tea in public places date back to the Tang dynasty in the seventh to tenth centuries A.D.
  • In both scholarly tea parties and common street-side “tiger stoves,” which sold hot water for brewing tea at home before setting up stools so that customers could linger, the tradition has its roots.

This fantasy obscures the differences between China and Japan, as well as the differences between Japanesechashitsu, which is a space designed specifically in accordance with the strict aesthetics of the tea ceremony, which is less a pastime than an art, andochaya, which is where geisha entertain guests.) Although the rise of teahouse culture in China was spurred by a desire for human connection, it is believed to have reached its apogee around the turn of the twentieth century in the city of Chengdu, in the southwestern province of Sichuan.

Farmers didn’t have to band together in villages because of the Chengdu Plain’s relative geographic isolation, rich soil, temperate climate, and extensive irrigation system; instead, they lived close to their fields in scattered, semi-isolated settlements, necessitating the need for gathering places like teahouses as hubs of both social interaction and commerce, similar to the Greek agora, the Italian piazza, and the Arabic souk.

  1. Teahouses were an important part of the everyday lives of the inhabitants of Chengdu; in 1909, the city had 454 teahouses spread among its 516 streets, which was a significant number for the time period.
  2. With semi-surgical equipment in hand, ear cleaners made their way around the room, cleaning ears.
  3. For the most part, they were not environments conducive to meditation or contemplation.
  4. ImageCredit.
  5. Strangers could engage and exchange ideas in the teahouse because it served as an interface between public and private life.

Teahouses were similar to the coffeehouses of 17th- and 18th-century European cities that, according to German philosopher and sociologistJürgen Habermas, were instrumental in bringing about the Enlightenment by dismantling the “monopoly of interpretation” previously held by the church and the state.

  • C.
  • However, according to the historian Qin Shao, early teahouses retained their subversive power because they served as microcosms of both the city and the country at the same time.
  • This was due in part to teahouses’ tacit approval of gambling, prostitution, and “the singing of obscene songs,” as well as the fact that leisure was suddenly perceived as a threat to productivity, defying modernization and the newly formalized workday.
  • “All you have to do is cultivate the land and plant rice.” Public life was not only restricted but also co-opted as a result of the Communist Party’s consolidation of power under the leadership of Mao Zedong, as evidenced by massive rallies and ubiquitous propaganda.

However, it was only during the post-Mao period, beginning in the late 1970s, that the tradition was revived, as the government began to relax controls over the private sector and move closer to Deng Xiaoping’s vision of a “socialist market economy.” The anthropologist Jinghong Zhang writes in ” Puer Tea: Ancient Caravans and Urban Chic ” that as living standards rose, so did a resurgent nostalgia — once regarded as dangerous, having been targeted by Mao’s campaign to destroy old customs, culture, habits, and ideas — as a way to reassert cultural identity amid the upheaval of China’s rapid transformation into a global power (2014).

Drinking tea, both at home and in public, has evolved into something of a patriotic gesture, an expression of one’s Chinese identity.

BEFORE THE PANDEMIC, De He feels somber in Shanghai, CHINA’s most technologically sophisticated megacity, in contrast to its rowdy Chengdu forerunners.

However, among the city’s tens of thousands of teahouses, a new vanguard suggests a shift from populist engagement to retreat and refinement, whether in settings stocked with antique furniture, as at De He, or styled in a self-consciously edgy aesthetic, as at theTingtai Teahouse, in the M50 art district in the former industrial zone of Putuo, with its tiers of private chambers in elevated stainless-steel boxes, as at Several tea houses provide high-end kinds of Bingdao Pu’er tea, Tieguanyin oolong tea, and Dianhong (a black tea from Yunnan Province in China’s southwest) that are brewed tableside by tea sommeliers.

  1. To avoid clients lingering for an excessive amount of time, reservations are frequently necessary.
  2. William H.
  3. Men with suits and briefcases disappear into closed-off rooms after a quick exchange of pleasantries.
  4. One of the locations, a branch of the Yinxi mini-chain on Yuqing Lu in the former French Concession, is virtually undetectable from the outside, save for a row of chubby, blank-faced monk dolls embedded in the wall.
  5. Tables are set in glass cylinders surrounded by water in the garden, and they can only be reached by stepping stones.

The interiors of some of these establishments appeal to the younger generation; others make tea the centerpiece of their operations, with formal ceremonies requiring a skilled practitioner, or as a luxury product, with prices for particularly rare varieties reaching thousands of yuan per pot, the equivalent of hundreds of dollars in the United States, or even higher.

  • Those freewheeling teahouses of old were where “ordinary folk” could gossip and express opinions, as well as “release destructive emotions and cope with social change,” without fear of repercussion or government intervention.
  • Perhaps the promise is not one of involvement, but rather the polar opposite of engagement: withdrawal.
  • Twitter and Facebook, at the very least for those who have unlimited access to them, are arguably vast virtual teahouses.
  • Those who are interested in learning more can find it.
  • What I am is a mystery, however.

In the two years since then, China has largely routed Covid-19 — a surge from the Delta variant in late July was largely quelled by the end of August — with strict mask mandates and sophisticated surveillance technologies, whereas the West, where individual freedom is often prized over collective responsibility, continues to struggle.

  • As a result, the previously freeing thought that no one is listening takes on a more sinister tinge: Is this because it doesn’t matter what people say; is it because nothing will change?
  • There is no street address for this location in the former French Concession, and instructions are only supplied once a reservation has been booked.
  • Greetings from the Wan Ling Tea House, where Cai Wan-Ling, a tea master from the southern province of Fujian, which is well-known for its oolong tea, preside over what has come to be known as the Chinese tea ceremony.
  • Josh Robenstone is the photographer that took this image.
  • Zhang contends that the origins of gong fu cha were not tied to any specific philosophical meaning, despite the fact that there existed a lengthy tradition of academic connoisseurship in Chinese tea drinking that was not formalized.
  • It is no longer important whether chayi is an ancient or modern tradition when Cai begins.
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Gaiwan, a lidded bowl with the lid representing heaven, its saucer representing earth, and its body representing the tea server negotiating between them; the “fair mug,”gong dao bei, which is placed at a 45-degree angle from the gaiwan and into which the tea is first poured, before it is poured into each guest’s cup, so that all will receive the same concentration of tea; a small folded towel to dab spills.

  • The date of harvest for each of her teas is something she is well familiar with.
  • 4, 2019, and there’s a white tea from March 29, 2016, both from the same source.
  • Her ritual before making the tea is to place the leaves into the gaiwan, close the lid, and gently shake it to release the fragrance.
  • With a dash of hot water poured into a side bowl, each component — gaiwan, gong dao bei, and cups wood-fired in a 400-year-old kiln — comes to temperature.
  • She boils the water just once or twice, “to keep the water alive,” as she explains it.
  • As the tea steeps, I sit with her in silence.
  • We haven’t escaped time, but we have managed to master it in some kind.

There’s more she wants to tell me — how the first infusion is delicate, the second more full-bodied; how the tea cools quicker in a clay cup; how she prefers to drink dark oolong on a wet day — and I lean closer to listen, for a minute forgetting about everything else going on around me.

In Loving Memory of Dean E. Bushnell: 1970-2021

WOMEN ARE THE CENTRAL POINT OF THE STORY PLAY CARDS, MAKE SMARTY FACES, AND BE IMMACULATELY BORED. cigarette smoke eddies We are in Huangpu, a central district of Shanghai with a population of approximately 25 million people — but these six women are the only other customers I see at De He Teahouse, which is located on the second floor of a sports complex and is only partially visible. It is October 2019, a little more than two months before the first reported cases of the novel coronavirus are reported around the world.

The teahouse, on the other hand, is a welcome respite from the crowds: I enter through a stone gate guarded by grinning lions, then cross a short bridge over koi snoring in a pond to arrive at a mausoleumesque sweep of glossy black tile and red lanterns with dripping tassels.

We’ve come for tea, but after we’ve ordered, we slink away from the table of women fanning their cards to the all-you-can-eat buffet, which includes congee, sweet corn soup, steamed taro, and luo song tang, a Shanghai adaptation of the borscht that Russian émigrés brought to the city after the October Revolution of 1917.

When you have a sudden reprieve from an incessant city, finding a kind of hiding place in plain sight in a country with a conflicted relationship to the notion of individual privacy, paradoxically being alone and at the same time joined with others, all dedicated to our pursuit of this fleeting moment, it’s lovely and also curiously unnecessary, almost incidental to the experience.

  1. I have no idea that, in a matter of months, venues like this will close their doors all over the world, and that my world will be reduced to the confines of my own home.
  2. ImageCredit.
  3. China’s concept of itself is arguably based on the use of tea.
  4. Records of tea cultivation date back to the Western Zhou dynasty in the 11th to eighth centuries B.C.
  5. ; and the first references to drinking tea in public places appear during the Tang dynasty in the seventh to tenth centuries A.D.
  6. In both scholarly tea parties and common street-side “tiger stoves,” which sold hot water for brewing tea at home before setting up stools so that customers could linger, it has its origins.

(Such a fantasy obscures the differences between China and Japan, as well as the differences between the Japanesechashitsu, a space designed specifically in accordance with the strict aesthetics of the tea ceremony, which is less a pastime than an art, andochaya, a space where geisha entertain customers.) However, in China, the rise of teahouse culture — which may have reached its apogee around the turn of the twentieth century in the city of Chengdu, in the southwestern province of Sichuan — was spurred on by a desire for human connection between individuals.

Because of the Chengdu Plain’s geographic isolation, rich soil, temperate climate, and extensive irrigation system, farmers were not required to live in villages; instead, they lived close to their fields in scattered, semi-isolated settlements, necessitating the need for gathering places like teahouses as hubs of both social interaction and commerce, similar to the Greek agora, the Italian piazza, and the Arabic souk.

  1. Teahouses were an important part of daily life for the people of Chengdu; in 1909, the city had 454 teahouses spread across its 516 streets.
  2. Ear cleaners made their way around the room, wielding semi-surgical instruments.
  3. In a nutshell, these were hardly meditative or rarefied environments.
  4. “There is frequently no space to sit.” ImageCredit.
  5. Strangers could engage and exchange ideas in the teahouse because it served as an interface between public and private life.

The teahouse shared this freedom with the coffeehouses of 17th- and 18th-century Europe, which have been credited by the German philosopher and sociologistJürgen Habermas with helping to birth the Enlightenment by removing the “monopoly of interpretation” previously held by the church and the state.

C.

However, according to historian Qin Shao, early teahouses retained subversive power because they served as microcosms of both the city and the country.

This was due in part to teahouses’ tacit permission of gambling, prostitution, and “the singing of obscene songs,” but also because leisure itself was suddenly perceived as a threat to productivity, defying modern Wang quotes a slogan from the early twentieth century: “Don’t go into teahouses or watch local operas; just cultivate the land and plant rice.” Public life was not only restricted but also co-opted as a result of the Communist Party’s consolidation of power under the leadership of Mao Zedong, through massive rallies and ubiquitous propaganda.

Many teahouses were forced to close during China’s Cultural Revolution in the 1960s and 1970s, when even a stray overheard phrase could result in condemnation.

The anthropologist Jinghong Zhang writes in ” Puer Tea: Ancient Caravans and Urban Chic ” that as living standards rose, so did a resurgent nostalgia — once regarded as dangerous, having been targeted by Mao’s campaign to destroy old customs, culture, habits, and ideas — as a way to reassert cultural identity amid the upheaval of China’s swift transformation into a global power.

Drinking tea, both at home and in public, has become almost a nationalistic act, an affirmation of one’s Chinese identity.

De He feels subdued in Shanghai, China’s most technologically advanced megacity, in the days before the pandemic, a far cry from its raucous Chengdu predecessors.

However, among the city’s thousands of teahouses, a new vanguard suggests a shift from populist engagement to retreat and refinement, whether in settings stocked with antique furniture, as at De He, or styled in a self-consciously edgy aesthetic, as at theTingtai Teahouse, in the M50 art district in the former industrial zone of Putuo, with its tiers of private chambers in elevated stainless-steel boxes.

  1. In some, tea sommeliers prepare high-priced varieties of Bingdao Pu’er, Tieguanyin oolong, and Dianhong (a black tea from Yunnan Province in China’s southwest), which are served at the table.
  2. It is an escape, but not from the passage of time, William H.
  3. Men with suits and briefcases disappear into closed-off rooms after a brief conversation.
  4. One of the locations, a branch of the Yinxi mini-chain on Yuqing Lu in the former French Concession, is virtually undetectable from the outside save for a series of pudgy, blank-faced monk dolls fitted into the wall.
  5. Tables stand cocooned in glass cylinders surrounded by water in the garden, and they can only be reached by steppingstones.

The interiors of some of these establishments appeal to the younger generation; others make tea the centerpiece of their offerings, with formal ceremonies requiring a skilled practitioner, or as a luxury product, with prices for particularly rare varieties reaching thousands of yuan per pot, the equivalent of hundreds of dollars in the United States.

It appears that they are embracing a new kind of nostalgia: for a period when the world was less demanding or simpler to block off.

Josh Robenstone is the photographer that captured this image.

Both, however, are restricted within China by a firewall, and their closest available social media analogues, the microblogging site Weibo and the messaging app WeChat, are closely controlled by the government.

During my brief stay in Shanghai, some locals tell me about the pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong, which began earlier that year (and were portrayed by state media on the mainland as the work of a few thugs in thrall to foreign agents), and the plight of the Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking and predominantly Muslim minority in western China, more than a million of whom have been imprisoned in re-education camps, which the government has claimed We are allowed to express ourselves in public, yet no one appears to be listening.

But, after all, who am I?

Two years later, China has largely routed Covid-19 — a surge from the Delta variant in late July had subsided by the end of August — with strict mask mandates and elaborate surveillance technologies, while the West, where individual freedom is often prized over collective responsibility, continues to struggle.

  1. In this environment, the freeing thought that no one is listening takes on a harsher tone: Is it because it doesn’t matter what people say; is it because nothing will change?
  2. The spot, which is located in the former French Concession, is off the beaten path, and instructions are offered only once a reservation has been made.
  3. This is the Wan Ling Tea House, where Cai Wan-Ling, a tea master from Anxi, in the southeastern province of Fujian — a region renowned for its oolong tea — preside over what has become known as the Chinese tea ceremony.
  4. Josh Robenstone is the photographer that captured this image.
  5. Zhang contends that the origins of gong fu cha were not tied to any specific philosophical meaning, despite the fact that there was a lengthy tradition of academic connoisseurship in Chinese tea drinking that wasn’t formalized.
  6. By the time Cai gets going, the question of whether chayi is an old or a new one is moot.

the lidded bowl,gaiwan, with the lid representing heaven, its saucer representing earth, and the body representing the tea server negotiating between them; the “fair mug,”gong dao bei, which is placed at a 45-degree angle from the gaiwan, into which the tea is poured first, before it is poured into each guest’s cup, so that all will receive the same concentration of tea; a small folded towel, to dab spills She is aware of the day on which each of her teas was picked.

  1. Here’s an oolong from Oct.
  2. She maintains a ballet-like posture.
  3. She then pours the tea into the mug.
  4. When serving more than one cup of tea, she likes a ceramic teapot since the material does not alter the taste.
  5. She has a set time for making each tea, down to the second, although she does not consult a clock when doing so.
  6. And here is the wonder: knowing how to tell time just by being present, keeping the seconds in the body, each one stable and oddly weighty.

She has more to say — how the first infusion is delicate, the second more full-bodied; how the tea cools faster in a clay cup; how she prefers to drink dark oolong on a wet day — and I lean forward to listen, for a minute forgetting about the rest of the world.

Death Notices: Jan. 4, 2022

RITA L. LARSON, 74, of Winlock, passed away on December 27 at her home. Cattermole Funeral Home in Winlock is in charge of the arrangements for the funeral. DENNIS “DENNY” HADALLER, 94, of Mossyrock, is a retired.

In Loving Memory of Michael Speelman: 1944-2021

Michael Theron Speelman died on December 26, 2021, at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon. He was 59. He was born on October 9, 1944, in the town of Baker, Oregon. On January 2, 1982, he tied the knot with Trish. They were married at the time.

Death Notices: Dec. 31, 2021

NANCY V. SOBOLESKY, 64, of Winlock, passed away on December 25 at Providence Centralia Hospital in Portland. Cattermole Funeral Home in Winlock is in charge of the arrangements for the funeral. RITA L. LARSON, 74, of Winlock, died on December 27 at her residence.

In Loving Memory of Veva Carlson: 1934-2021

On December 25, Nancy V. Sobolesky died at Providence Centralia Hospital in Winlock, Washington. The Cattermole Funeral Home in Winlock is in charge of the arrangements. In her home in Winlock on December 27, RITA L. LARSON passed away. She was 74 years old.

In Loving Memory of John J. Jendryka Jr.: 1937-2021

John J. Jendryka Jr. died away peacefully at his residence on December 21, 2021, after a long battle with cancer. He was surrounded by the people he cared about. Born on November 1, 1937, to John and Angeline Jendryka in the town of. More information may be found here.

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